Archive for the ‘Politics & Elections’ Category

Following hand ballot count Torres-Walker beats Motts by 3 votes in Antioch Council race

Friday, December 2nd, 2022

Re-elected Antioch District 1 Councilwoman Tamisha Torres-Walker and the final results of the election from the Contra Costa County Elections Division.

8 of the challenged ballots were not cured; results now certified; possible recount could be costly

“I don’t think I can do this without you…I want to partner with you” – Torres-Walker to Motts

Joy Motts and Tamisha Torres-Walker hug and speak following the hand ballot count on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. Photo by Allen D. Payton

By Allen D. Payton

After waiting weeks for the ballot counting to be completed, including a hand count, a change in the lead then a tie as of last Wednesday, Nov. 23, and 19 challenged ballots that required curing, the Antioch City Council race in District 1 has been decided. Incumbent Councilwoman Tamisha Torres-Walker beat challenger and former Councilwoman Jot Motts by just three votes. The final results according to the Contra Costa County Elections Division Torres-Walker ends with 1,467 or 34.36% and Motts has 1,464 votes or 34.29 percent of the vote. Diane Gibson-Gray ended the race with 1,339 votes or 31.26% to round out the close contest.

Following the hand count of the ballots at the county elections office on Thursday, the two candidates who were waiting and watching the hand count at the county elections office, along with one supporter, each, made brief comments, hugged and spoke with each other.

“It’s been a long haul,” Torres-Walker said with a laugh.

Speaking with Motts she said, “I don’t think I can do this without you. You love Antioch and I want to partner with you. I don’t know what people downtown

want. You do. I want you to tell me, advise me and I want to work with you.”

A disappointed Motts agreed to then said about the election results and the hand ballot count, “I really appreciate they did this, that they took the extra time.”

Elections Services Specialist Evan Ayers (right) collects counted ballots from Elections Division staff during a hand count on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. Photo by Allen D. Payton

Possible Recount Could Be Costly, 8 Challenged Ballots Not Cured

Regarding questions and discussions by some Antioch residents and others of a recount with the results so close, Assistant Registrar of Voters Helen Nolan said, “Anyone can ask for a recount, but they have to be willing to front the money to pay for it. The daily cost is anywhere from $2,500 to $10,000. It depends on the method the requester wants.”

“Yesterday, we used printed images of every ballot,” she explained. “A recount would not be dissimilar. We could use the images of the ballots which would take less time and cost less. The most expensive way and would take the longest time is if we have to pull the paper ballots from the stored ballots. That’s because we don’t store them by precinct anymore. They’re stored in batches as they came in. So, among the 1.3 million ballot pages from this election we’d have to find 4,500 ballots with the District 1 election votes on them.”

“If the election is overturned, they receive a refund,” she added.

Asked what difference another hand ballot count would make Nolan responded, “It wouldn’t. We’d be looking at the same ballots as we did, yesterday.”

However, during Thursday’s hand count the elections staff used copies of images of the ballots that had been scanned into the machines not the actual ballots.

Elections Division Voting Systems Manager Travis Ebbert showed those watching yesterday’s count “three ballots that were adjudicated and required a human to make the decision,” Nolan explained. “We separate them by votes and anything you can’t tell they’re adjudicated and the vote determined. The two included votes for both candidates but the person had marked it out. That removed one vote each. The third one was either an overvote or it could have been a vote for either candidate and Tamisha still wins.”

“We went through all the ballots including the 11 out of the 19 challenged ballots were cured since Nov. 23,” she continued. “The other eight ballots remain challenged.”

“We didn’t get a letter back and we weren’t able to cure them,” Nolan stated. “Those were not counted, nor will those ballots be opened during a recount.”

“We’re required to keep everything for this election for 22 months,” she shared.

Asked about the latest vote totals on the Elections Division website Nolan said, “Those are the final numbers. We will be certifying them, today. But those numbers will not change.”

Results Certified

In a press release Friday afternoon, it was announced that Contra Costa County Clerk-Recorder-Registrar Debi Cooper certified the results of the November 8, 2022 General Election today.

“Our elections team has once again administered an accurate, transparent, safe and secure election for Contra Costa County.  This team of expert staff made a very complicated and technical process look easy – it isn’t,” Cooper said. “I am proud of this talented group, who make democracy happen for Contra Costa voters and provide incredible service.  This includes: permanent staff, temporary workers, poll workers, and volunteers. I want to thank each of them for their hard work and civic service.  It is my honor and privilege to certify my last election as the head of this department.”

The Elections Division conducted the canvass to complete the official count of all qualified ballots and to perform audits to verify the tabulation equipment performed as intended.

The purpose of the canvass accomplishes four primary tasks: ensuring that every eligible ballot is counted, that voters only voted once, that proper procedures were followed, and that the vote tabulation system counted ballots properly.

The final turnout for this Primary Election totaled 394,153 ballots cast, representing 56.15% of the 701,969 registered voters of Contra Costa County.

The final official report for this election is now posted on the Contra Costa County Elections website at www.contracostavote.gov.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Motts catches Torres-Walker in tied-up Antioch City Council District 1 race

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022

Joy Motts and Tamisha Torres-Walker are tied in the Antioch City Council District 1 race as of Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022.

19 challenged ballots remain to be counted; if remains a tie the candidates would decide the tie breaker

By Allen D. Payton

As of Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022, at 3:12:59 PM, the Contra Costa Elections Division website shows incumbent Antioch District 1 Councilwoman Tamisha Torres-Walker and challenger Joy Motts are tied with 1,462 votes each. While the website shows there are still 1,900 ballots remaining to be counted in the county, according to Assistant Registrar of Voters Helen Nolan, “now, there are 19 challenged votes in the Antioch City Council District 1 race.”

“They’re either unsigned or the signatures don’t match,” she explained. “Every single person who has a challenged ballot has received a letter in order to cure that signature, either to provide a signature or provide their signature that matches what we have on file.”

“The important thing to remember is what we have on file is most likely what is on their driver’s license,” Nolan added.

“What the campaigns can do, and I believe are doing, are get copies of the challenged voters list and contact those voters,” she stated. The list is available but “it either has to be for education purposes or for elections purposes.”

Of the 1,900 ballots remaining in the county, 217 are listed as Provisional, which are described as “CVR (Conditional Voter Registration) Ballots In Review” and 1,683 listed as Other, meaning “Challenged VBM (Vote By Mail) Ballots” in which there was “No Signature” or the “Signature Does Not Match” what the Elections Division has on file. The challenged ballots in the Antioch race are among both types of remaining ballots.

According to the California Secretary of State’s website, “A ‘CVR voter’ is a person who, on Election Day or the fourteen (14) days immediately preceding Election Day, does both of the following:

  1. Delivers an executed affidavit of registration to the county elections official in order to register to vote in California for the first time, or re-register to vote in the same or a different county in California. The executed affidavit of registration can be submitted either in person at any permanent office of the county elections official, at any vote center or polling place, or at any satellite office designated by the county elections official or online through the Internet Web site of the Secretary of State.
  2. Requests a CVR ballot at any permanent office of the county elections official, at any vote center or polling place, or at any satellite office designated by the county elections official.”

Voters with challenged ballots have until Wednesday, Nov. 30 to cure their ballot with the county Elections Division office.

Tie-Breaker Decided by Candidates

Asked what happens if there’s a tie vote Nolan said the election would be decided by “whatever tie breaker the candidates agree to. It could be a flip of a coin, roll of the dice or rock, paper, scissors.”

 

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Contra Costa County Elections Division named Center for Elections Excellence

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022

Nonpartisan program supports and celebrates excellence in U.S. election administration

By Dawn Kruger, Civic Outreach/Engagement Specialist, Contra Costa County Clerk-Recorder-Elections Department

The Contra Costa County Elections Division has been selected by the nonpartisan U.S. Alliance for Election Excellence as a Center for Election Excellence.  This is recognition that Contra Costa County Elections is committed to leadership in election administration and focused on developing even more resilient, trustworthy, and voter-centric election administration practices.

As a Center for Election Excellence, the Contra Costa County Elections Division will have an opportunity to work together with a bipartisan group of election officials to support each other and improve their skills. The diverse inaugural 2023 cohort of Centers for Election Excellence include:

  • Contra Costa County, CA
  • Shasta County, CA
  • Greenwich, CT
  • Kane County, IL
  • Macoupin County, IL
  • Ottawa County, MI
  • Clark County, NV
  • Brunswick County, NC
  • Forsyth County, NC
  • Madison, WI

According to a recent study from MIT, public spending on election services ranks near the bottom, about the same as what local governments spend on parking facilities. This means professional development opportunities for election department staff can be extremely limited. The Alliance will provide Contra Costa Elections staff opportunities to collaborate with and share best practices with their colleagues from around the country, creating a national community of learning and support.

“I am thrilled we have chosen the Contra Costa County Elections Division as a Center for Election Excellence,” said Tiana Epps-Johnson, executive director of the Center for Tech and Civic Life. “Contra Costa Elections is a leader in safe, secure, and inclusive elections that put voters first. This program will take their election administration work to the next level.”

“While I have always known that staff at the Contra Costa County Elections Division are expert at what they do, incredibly innovative, and provide an exceptionally high level of service to the Contra Costa Community, I am excited and proud that this department and our staff are being recognized nationally for the hard work we do.” said Debi Cooper, Clerk-Recorder-Registrar of Contra Costa County.

The U.S. Alliance for Election Excellence launched in 2022 and is a five-year, $80 million nonpartisan program that brings together election officials, designers, technologists, and other experts to envision, support, and celebrate excellence in U.S. election administration. Launch partners include:

  • Center for Tech and Civic Life:  connects Americans with the information to become and remain civically engaged and ensure that elections are inclusive and secure.
  • Center for Civic Design: works with elections offices and advocates across the country, using research, design, accessibility, and plain language to remove barriers and invite participation in democracy.
  • The Elections Group: partners with state and local election officials to implement new programs or improve processes for voters and stakeholders by providing guidance, resources, and management support.
  • U.S. Digital Response: is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization provides election officials with simple, effective digital tools and rapid response.
  • Institute for Responsive Government & Center for Secure and Modern Elections: aligns bipartisan, pro-voter campaigns, making elections more efficient and secure.
  • Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (the d.school) at Stanford University: referred to as the d.school, the institute brings students and faculty from radically different backgrounds together to develop innovative, human-centered solutions to real world challenges.
  • Prototyping Systems Lab: utilizes elements of design thinking, participatory design, and critical making to create change within complex systems.
Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Rocha finally claims victory in Antioch School Board Area 5 race

Thursday, November 17th, 2022

Unofficial Results from Interim Update 2 in the Antioch School Board Area 5 race. Source: CoCoVote.us. Re-elected Trustee Mary Rocha.

“I will see what the next four years will bring for me. I enjoy what I do and always have.”

By Allen D. Payton

With almost all the votes in the county counted and only 6,800 unprocessed ballots remaining, as of Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 16, 2022, in the Antioch School Board Area 5, incumbent Trustee Mary Rocha has, again increased her lead over newcomer Dominique King, now to 474 votes.

However, as of Thursday afternoon the Contra Costa Elections Division website now shows there are only 2,300 unprocessed ballots remaining in the county.

The long-time Antioch politician now has 2,101 votes or 56.36% to 1,627 or 43.64% of the vote for the first-time candidate.

A message posted on Rocha’s campaign Facebook page read, “Thank you. Although we continue to wait for the official final tally, I want you all to know how much I appreciate your support, your confidence and your votes. I hope to continue helping our students and staff. With gratitude, Mary.”

However, following the latest results update, Rocha finally accepted her victory Thursday afternoon saying, “This has been an interesting campaign. First of all, I didn’t know how I stood with my own neighbors. It was the first time I had to run a campaign in my own area. My very first campaign was for the bonds to build Mission School. I went around and got everyone registered to vote and we got the 500 votes to approve the bonds.”

“I’ve been participating a lot at Turner Elementary reading to the kids” she added about another school in her Trustee Area.

“At my age level, I’m not able to campaign like I used to. I have to give it to my committee who did a lot of work. They did a great job,” Rocha stated. “It was interesting too, to have Louie, my son in charge. He asked, ‘you want to run again? Do you want me to take you out in a coffin?’ I told him I still have interest so, he said, ‘OK. I’ll help you.’”

“My grandson was my treasurer, my daughter-in-law was my secretary, and my son was the chair of the campaign,” she continued. “There were more people that I want to thank, as well.”

“Now that I’ve been elected, I’m looking forward to people stepping forward to take my place in this position four years from now. I’m encouraging whoever is interested to follow me. It’s time,” said the 83-year-old. “In the past I never really wanted to let go. But the time has come. I really have to do it. I will see what the next four years will bring for me. I enjoy what I do and always have.”

At the next school board meeting on Dec. 16, Rocha will join Dr. Jaguanana “Jag” Lathan, elected without opposition in the district’s new Area 2, for their oaths of office.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Torres-Walker pulls ahead of Motts by two votes in Antioch Council District 1 race

Thursday, November 17th, 2022

Unofficial Results from Interim Update 2 in the Antioch City Council District 1 race. Source: CoCoVote.us

Wilson increases lead over Ogorchock in District 4 race; now only 2,300 unprocessed votes remain in county

By Allen D. Payton

With almost all the votes in the county counted and only 6,800 unprocessed ballots remaining, as of Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 16, 2022, in the race for Antioch District 1 incumbent Councilwoman Tamisha-Torres Walker now leads former Councilwoman Joy Motts by just two votes. Former Antioch School Board Trustee Diane Gibson-Gray is trailing in third place by 123 votes.

However, as of Thursday afternoon the Contra Costa Elections Division website now shows there are only 2,300 unprocessed ballots remaining in the county. How many of those are in District 1 remain to be seen.

Council District 1

The “Unofficial Results – Interim Update 2” shows Torres-Walker with 1,445 votes or 34.3% and Motts with 1,443 votes or 34.25% of the vote. Gibson-Gray has 1,325 votes or 31.45%. The total votes cast in the race this year are just 4,213 compared to almost 8,000 cast in 2020.

If the contest results in a tie, according to elections personnel, the winner can be decided by the flip of a coin, or some other method agreed upon by the two candidates.

Unofficial Results from Interim Update 2 in the Antioch City Council District 4 race. Source: CoCoVote.us

Council District 4

In the District 4 race for city council, incumbent Monica Wilson extended her lead over colleague and challenger, Lori Ogorchock to 608 votes. Wilson now has 2,579 or 36.58% to the District 3 councilwoman’s 1,971 votes or 27.96% of the vote. Newcomer Shawn Pickett now has 1,304 votes or 18.5% and second-time candidate Sandra White remains in fourth place with 1,196 votes or 16.96% of the vote. A total of 7,050 votes were cast in the district compared to 11,768 in 2020.

Assuming not much change in the final results, Wilson will be the city’s next mayor pro tem as the candidate with the greatest percentage of the vote in the two council district elections.

Another update is expected this Friday afternoon. The county has until Dec. 8 to certify the election.

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Connelly leads big for Contra Costa Clerk-Recorder, Carlson ahead of Allen in Supervisor race

Thursday, November 10th, 2022

(L-R, T-B) Kristin Connelly leads Vicki Gordon for County Clerk and Ken Carlson is ahead of Debora Allen for District 4 County Supervisor. Sources: Official campaign photos.

Butler, Maxwell win, Lewis leading in county school board races

170,000 ballots to be counted as of Wed., more ballots arriving through Tues., Nov. 15 could affect results

By Allen D. Payton

As of the latest update on the Contra Costa County Elections Division website on Wednesday, Nov. 9 at 12:03 a.m., with all precincts reporting, Acalanes School Board Trustee Kristin Connelly appears to be winning the race for County Clerk-Recorder and Pleasant Hill City Councilman Ken Carlson is ahead in the race for District 4 County Supervisor. The district includes Concord, Clayton, Pleasant Hill and portions of Walnut Creek.

County Clerk-Recorder

With 100,938 votes or 53.55% of the vote Connelly has a commanding lead over former Contra Costa College Board Trustee Vicki Gordon who had 87,567 votes or 46.45% of the vote. Carlson is leading BART Board Member Debora Allen by 4,122 votes. He had 26,110 votes or 54.17% to her 22,088 votes or 42.83% of the vote.

According to county elections personnel, after receiving Wednesday’s mail there were an estimated 170,000 unprocessed ballots. The latest figures on the website don’t include all the vote-by-mail ballots submitted on Election Day including at the polls.

As a result, Connelly is not declaring victory, just yet. When reached for comment Thursday afternoon she responded, “I am very excited about how the results are shaping up in my race and look forward to the timely count continuing.”

Carlson Declares Victory in District 4 Supervisor’s Race

In a post on his campaign Facebook page on Wednesday Carlson was more confident in the results declaring victory. He wrote, “It has been a long, hard fought campaign, but WE GOT IT DONE, and I am proud to claim #VICTORY! I am humbled to have had your support, and I am grateful to now have the opportunity to serve all of District 4 as your next Supervisor! Countless groups and individuals made this win possible. I share the credit for this victory with a great many folks in our community. I want to say thank you to my opponent, Debora Allen for helping keep this campaign about the issues that matter to each and every one of us. I am ready to roll up my sleeves and get to work. THANK YOU.”

On Wednesday, Allen conceded on her campaign Facebook page writing, “The results are in, and it is clear I fell short of the votes needed by 4100, to win the District 4 seat on the Contra Costa Board of Supervisors. We came close, but as my dad used to say, close only counts in horseshoes, hand grenades, and ballroom dancing.

To my family, friends, supporters, donors, and colleagues, I extend a big THANK YOU for your support, contributions, love and encouragement. I am forever grateful for your faith in me.

To the voters of Contra Costa, thank you for the 22K votes of support and the great conversations at your doors, in your businesses, and at public events over the last year. I learned a lot about the people of our county.

To the public employees’ and construction labor unions who provided $300K of funding to oppose me and support Carlson in this general election, congratulations, you won! You just bought yourselves a supervisor. Your nasty disinformation tactics are what continue to win elections for unions and keep you in control of our government.

To Contra Costa Supervisor-elect Ken Carlson for County Supervisor 2022, I wish you all the best as the next Contra Costa Supervisor in District 4. I hope you will find the courage to stand up to all that union money that elected you, especially when voting on their labor contracts, or on construction project labor agreements to shut out all local non-union construction businesses from the work in this county.

Until we run again!”

However, on Thursday Allen posted, “UPDATE 11/10/22: We should have better tallies of votes by 5pm today. Will update then.”

Assuming a fifth of the remaining 170,000 unprocessed ballots are for the District 4 race, Allen would need 62% of them or 21,123 votes of the estimated 34,000 ballots that were remaining to be counted in order to eke out a win.

County Board of Education

In the races for county Board of Education, incumbents Sarah Butler in Area 2 and Mike Maxwell in Area 4 have defeated their challengers by wide margins, and Annette Lewis in Area 5 is leading her closest challenger, Justin Brown by 2,556 votes or by 7.35% a margin that could prove insurmountable.

Butler had 24,621 votes or 50.69% of the vote defeating Lisa Disbrow with 13,450 votes or 27.69%, and Rupy Krishnan with 10,501 or 21.62% of the vote.

The race for Area 4 was closer as Maxwell had 19,127 votes or 43.44% of the vote defeating challengers Cheri Calgano with 13,672 votes or 31.05%, and Anaité Letona with 11,229 votes or 25.5% of the vote.

Finally, in the Area 5 race, Lewis had 15,250 votes or 45.83% to Brown’s 12,694 votes or 36.48% followed by challenger Derek Carson II with 6,582 votes or 19.69% of the vote.

Thursday afternoon Lewis shared, “Waiting to see what tonight’s numbers will show. This morning’s returns by district show roughly 22,000 more ballots turned in my area.”

Next Update Thursday Afternoon

The next update for results in all elections in the county is expected later today, Thursday, Nov. 10 before 5:00 p.m.

Please check this website later for that update.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Contra Costa Elections still has 170,000 ballots remaining to be counted

Thursday, November 10th, 2022

Ballots lined up to be counted in the County Elections office on Tuesday, November 15, 2016. Herald file photo

Ballots still arriving and can through the mail until next Tuesday

Next results update expected later today

By Allen D. Payton

According to county Elections Division personnel, after receiving Wednesday’s mail there were 170,000 unprocessed ballots remaining to be counted in the county. They are also receiving ballots dropped off in other counties and have seven days from the election to receive ballots postmarked by Nov. 8, which is through next Tuesday, Nov. 15

The latest figures on the Elections Division website as of 12:03 a.m. Wednesday morning, Nov. 9 show 229,444 ballots had been cast and counted by then.  They don’t include all the vote-by-mail ballots submitted on Election Day including those dropped off at polling places, according to Elections Division staff.

The remaining total is nearly an additional 57% of ballots that have were counted as of Election Night and a total of 36% of total ballots cast in the election, leaving many close races in the county left to be decided.

The next update for results in all elections in the county is expected later today, Thursday, Nov. 10 before 5:00 p.m.

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Motts, Wilson, Rocha lead in Antioch elections

Wednesday, November 9th, 2022

Joy Motts, Monica Wilson and Mary Rocha in their official campaign photos currently lead in their respective races.

Gibson-Gray, Ogorchock each in close second

By Allen D. Payton

The election results for both Antioch City Council Districts 1 and 4 show tight races with former Councilwoman Joy Motts and incumbent Councilwoman Monica Wilson ahead of their challengers but not by much. In the Area 5 Antioch School Board Area 5 race, incumbent Trustee Mary Rocha is beating newcomer Dominique King by a larger margin.

Council District 1

As of the latest results posted on the Contra Costa Elections Division website Wednesday morning at 12:03 a.m., Motts was still in first place as she’s been since initial returns at 8:35 p.m. last night. Now, she leads former school board Trustee Diane Gibson-Gray by just 37 votes and incumbent Councilwoman Tamisha Torres-Walker is trailing by only 117 votes.

Motts had 914 votes or 35.32% to Gibson-Gray’s 877 or 33.89% followed by Torres-Walker with 797 votes or 30.8% of the vote.

When asked her thoughts Tuesday night, Motts simply replied, “It’s too early.”

Gibson-Gray offered her thoughts responding to a request for comment with, “The race is too close to call. However, with that said, the voters in District 1 clearly saw the need for change.”

Council District 4

Wilson is besting fellow and current District 3 Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock by a wider but still narrow margin of 161 votes. Newcomer Shawn Pickett placed third upsetting second-time candidate Sandra White, who was backed by Mayor Pro Tem Mike Barbanica, placed fourth. A surprised and disappointed White said there wouldn’t be a third campaign.

Wilson has 1,376 votes or 34.71%, to Ogorchock’s 1,215 votes or 30.65% of the vote, followed by Pickett with 703 votes or 17.73% and White with 670 votes or 16.9%.

Reached for comment, Ogorchock said, “It’s not final. I think I have an opportunity to overcome her. Looking at the totality of the votes, it goes to show the support for her has declined since 2020 when she won over 50%. So, we’ll just have to wait and see once the election is certified.”

School Board Area 5

Long-time local elected official Rocha appears to be headed for re-election with 1,325 votes or 57.33% to 986 and 42.67% of the vote for first-time candidate King.

When asked her thoughts on the race Rocha responded Wednesday morning, “They say I won, but I am still on edge with all the ballots that came in the day of the election. I think we are safe and able to balance the board this next year.”

According to the California Secretary of State’s website, “Election results will change throughout the canvass period as vote-by-mail ballots, provisional ballots (including conditional voter registration provisional ballots), and other ballots are tallied.” So, the lead could switch back.

The county elections office has until Dec. 8 to certify the election.

Please check back here and on our Facebook page for additional election updates in these races.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter