Archive for the ‘Police & Crime’ Category

East County police departments, CHP to conduct joint traffic enforcement May 27 to 29

Thursday, May 26th, 2022

Photo: APD

Will focus on reckless driving and sideshows, plus conduct emissions inspections for illegal equipment

By Sergeant Rob Green #3639, Antioch Police Traffic Unit

The Antioch Police Department in partnership with the Brentwood Police Department, Pittsburg Police Department, Oakley Police Department, and California Highway Patrol will conduct a joint traffic enforcement detail May 27 to 29, 2022. The joint operation will focus on reckless driving and sideshow activity in the East County and conduct vehicle emissions inspections. Any vehicles found with illegal emissions equipment will be referred to a California Smog Referee. This is in response to information provided by citizens regarding a planned sideshow event to take place in the East County area.

Antioch PD would like to thank our law enforcement partners and the citizens who help aid in our investigations.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Antioch Police Department non-emergency line at (925) 778-2441. You may also text-a-tip to 274637 (CRIMES) using the key word ANTIOCH. #DontDriveReckless #ItsTheLaw #YoullGoToJail #CarsGoToJailToo

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DA candidate Knox challenged Becton’s failure to act on Antioch mayor’s DUI one day before press release issued about April 1 charges

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

Deputy D.A. Mary Knox, Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe and D.A. Diana Becton.

Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe has endorsed D.A. Diana Becton in her re-election campaign; she contributed to his anti-recall campaign

Becton’s campaign shoots back accusing Knox of asking for leniency on friend’s 2017 DUI charges; Knox’s campaign responds to accusation

By Allen D. Payton

On May 19, the Mary Knox for District Attorney campaign released a statement calling for action from District Attorney Diana Becton after more than 60 days had passed with no action on a DUI case involving a Becton campaign endorser, Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe. The Herald was not made aware of Knox’s campaign press release until after receiving the press release from the DA’s office on Friday, May 20 announcing charges had been filed against Thorpe on April 1. (See related article)

In addition, on May 8 a Public Records Act request was submitted by Walnut Creek resident Scott Buckley asking for “details related to the recent DUI arrest of Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe and any correspondence details related to this case or prosecution of the case.” In a May 17 response to Buckley, Deputy District Attorney Sophea Nop denied the request for documents claiming they’re exempt, but also wrote, “Additionally, I have determined that there are no documents in either the physical or electronic file which constitutes correspondence between Lamar Thorpe and the District Attorney’s Office regarding this case.”

CCDA response to Buckley PRA. Source: Knox campaign (redacted by the Herald)

The Knox press release reads as follows:

“The Contra Costa Herald previously reported that District Attorney Diana Becton held a private meeting with Mayor Thorpe just three days following the incident.

‘It has now been more than 60 days since it was reported that Mayor Lamar Thorpe was arrested for a DUI and yet we have seen no action come from the D.A.’s office,’ said Jamie Patton, spokeswoman for Deputy District Attorney Mary Knox, candidate for District Attorney, on Thursday, May 19. ‘Contra Costa residents deserve safety from drivers who recklessly drive under the influence of alcohol. Everyone wants to see their District Attorney act with integrity and fairness, regardless of a person’s position of power or influence, yet D.A. Diana Becton met with Lamar Thorpe personally following the incident and we continue to see no action to prosecute. We believe D.A. Diana Becton must address this glaring dereliction of duty and take action on this rapidly-aging case.’

Knox has served as a Prosecutor in the Contra Costa District Attorney’s office for 37 years and has extensive trial experience. Knox has earned the endorsement of every law enforcement agency in the County, as well as state and local organizations such as the California Correctional Peace Officers Association, PORAC, the California Narcotics Officers Association and the California Gang Investigators Association. Mary has advanced social justice while preventing crime in Contra Costa County.  She brought anti-bias training to the District Attorney’s Office and has fought to end discrimination against women in the Contra Costa County’s District Attorney’s Office.

Mary Knox and the incumbent are the only candidates running for election as District Attorney.  Since this election will be won by a simple majority, the election of the next District Attorney of Contra Costa County will be determined by the votes cast on June 7, 2022.

March 2022: Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe Was Arrested For Driving Under The Influence. “On Saturday, Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe confirmed in a video that he was arrested by the California Highway Patrol for a DUI. CHP later released a statement confirming the incident just before 11:00 am.” [East County Today, 3/19/22]

Becton Had “Private Meeting” With Thorpe Three Days After His Arrest, As District Attorney’s Office Was Investigating Incident. “Three days after Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe was arrested for DUI and while the Contra Costa District Attorney’s Office was investigating the incident, on Tuesday, March 22, 2022, he held a private meeting with D.A. Diana Becton in her office in Martinez, according to reports of what was seen on her visitor sign-in log. Neither Becton, her staff nor Thorpe will say what the meeting was about or if anyone else, such as the city attorney or interim city manager, was in the room with them.” [Contra Costa Herald, 3/30/22]

Thorpe Later Confirmed He Had Met With Becton, Said She Had Requested “Cooperation In The Investigation.” “During a press conference, Wednesday morning, April 4, 2022 on Antioch Police Department staffing, hiring incentives and the investigation of officers by the FBI and Contra Costa D.A.’s office, Mayor Lamar Thorpe confirmed what had been previously reported, of a private meeting that he had with Contra Costa District Attorney Diana Becton on Tuesday, March 22, the day before the investigation occurred. He said Interim Antioch City Manager Con Johnson was also in attendance. The meeting was held just three days following Thorpe’s arrest for DUI and while he was under investigation by her department… Thorpe said the meeting was held by Becton to request his and Johnson’s cooperation in the investigation and they were to ‘keep confidentiality as this was an ongoing investigation’.” [Contra Costa Herald, 4/4/22]

As of May 2022, a search of Contra Costa County’s online case portal did not show any pending cases involving Thorpe. [cc-courts.org]

We mailed a criminal records search request regarding Thorpe to the Contra Costa County Superior court on May 11, 2022 and are awaiting a response.

Thorpe is listed as a campaign endorser on Becton’s campaign website.”

——————-

Source: Becton campaign.

Becton’s Campaign Manager Fires Back at Knox

The following was posted on Becton’s campaign Facebook page on Saturday, May 21 about Knox, in 2017, asking for leniency for a friend who was arrested for DUI:

“An important message from DA Becton’s Campaign Manager, Champagne Brown:

In her latest baseless attack against District Attorney Becton, Mary Knox claims to want accountability for ‘drivers who drive recklessly under the influence of alcohol.’ And yet, in 2017, Knox pled with a judge for leniency—and no accountability—for a colleague from the DA’s Office who drove under the influence of alcohol, crashing head on into another car and critically injuring the driver.

That person was George Driscoll, now the manager of the independent expenditure that has funneled nearly $250,000 from police associations to elect Mary Knox.

Source: Becton campaign.

DUI is the most common offense among California police officers (eastbaytimes.com)

Despite Knox’s letter to the judge pleading for leniency, George Driscoll was nevertheless convicted of a felony and removed from his duties as a law enforcement officer.

This is yet another example of Mary Knox’s hypocrisy and corruption—she is for ‘law and order,’ except when it comes to her well-connected friends and donors.

Source: Becton campaign

She cannot be trusted to hold people she owes—including police associations—accountable.

Contra Costa County deserves a District Attorney who is courageous enough to ensure the justice system works for everyone, not just the well connected.”

Knox Campaign Responds

In response to the accusation from Becton’s campaign, Knox’s campaign spokeswoman Upton wrote, “Ms. Becton’s latest attack on Mary Knox once again demonstrates her failure to acknowledge her conflict of interest inherent in the prosecution of Mayor Lamar Thorpe.  Mayor Thorpe has endorsed Ms. Becton’s political campaign, donated to Mayor Thorpe’s effort to stave off the recall campaign launched against him and met with Mayor Thorpe in her office just days after he was arrested, Ms. Becton should have recused herself from this prosecution following Mayor Thorpe’s arrest.

Mary Knox acted ethically in writing a letter to the judge presiding over the sentencing of a case that qualified for Veterans Court in Lassen County. A judge is required by law to consider whether a veteran’s military service contributed to the commission of the criminal offense, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, as well as standard factors in mitigation in sentencing. In her letter, Ms. Knox described for the judge this veteran’s service to his country that resulted in awards, including a Bronze Star for his service in Iraq, by President Obama and President Bush in a service career that spanned three decades with tremendous personal sacrifice.  Mary Knox properly provided the sentencing judge with information that he was required by law to consider in sentencing.”

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Antioch Council forms Police Oversight Commission on split votes

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

Commissioners can have criminal record, but no former Antioch cops or family members allowed

By Allen D. Payton

During their meeting on Tuesday, May 24, the Antioch City Council voted 3-1 to form a seven-member Police Oversight Commission with District 3 Councilwoman voting no and Mayor Pro Tem Mike Barbanica absent. The item was the second reading for the commission’s creation which passed on a 3-1 vote during the last meeting when Ogorchock was absent and Barbanica voted no.  Resolution forming Antioch Police Oversight Commission ACC052422

According to the staff report, “Civilian oversight of police departments is an evolving governmental function designed to provide the community with a means to influence police department policies and to help ensure that policing is conducted in a manner that is constitutional, effective, and responsive to the standards, values, and expectations of those served by the police department.

The City Council directed City staff to research and make recommendations to the City Council Police Oversight Standing Committee on the potential formation of an Antioch Police Oversight Commission (‘Police Commission’). City staff researched (1) police oversight commissions and boards in general law and charter cities; (2) the differences between police oversight commissions in general law cities and charter cities; and (3) solutions that can be achieved under each type of government within state and local laws and policies.

City staff has prepared an ordinance forming the Antioch Police Oversight Commission with the aim of strengthening trust, transparency, accountability, and police-community relations in the City of Antioch by ensuring that the Antioch Police Department’s policies, practices, and customs meet or exceed national standards of constitutional policing.

The purpose of the Antioch Police Oversight Commission is to strengthen trust, transparency, accountability, and police-community relations in the City of Antioch by ensuring that the Antioch Police Department’s policies, practices, and customs meet or exceed national standards of constitutional policing.

The Police Commission shall advise the City Council, City Manager, and Chief of Police on the administration of the Antioch Police Department and on policy matters concerning public safety within the City of Antioch. The Police Commission shall facilitate community participation and oversight by reviewing and recommending policies, procedures, practices, and programs designed to result in community policing that is effective, responsive, and sensitive to the diverse needs of the residents of the City.

The Police Commission shall promote and encourage open communication and cooperation between the Antioch Police Department and residents of the City, recognizing that policing the City of Antioch is a shared responsibility.

The Police Commission shall develop, review, and make policy recommendations aimed at informing the community of its rights and responsibilities when interacting with police officers.”

Purpose of Commission

Also, according to the resolution adopted by the council, “The purpose of the Police Commission is to advise the City Council, City Manager, and Chief of Police on the administration of the Antioch Police Department and on matters of public safety within the City of Antioch to ensure that the Antioch Police Department’s policies, practices, and customs conform to national standards of constitutional policing.

The Police Commission shall facilitate community participation and oversight by reviewing and recommending policies, procedures, practices, and programs designed to result in community policing that is effective, responsive, and sensitive to the diverse needs of the residents of the City.

The Police Commission shall promote and encourage open communication and cooperation between the Antioch Police Department and residents of the City, recognizing that policing the City of Antioch is a shared responsibility.

The Police Commission shall develop, review, and make policy recommendations aimed at informing the community of its rights and responsibilities when interacting with police officers.”

Commissioners Can Have Criminal Record

The adopted resolution also includes details on membership of the commission.

“The Mayor and the City Council shall strive to appoint and confirm at least:

(a) one (1) representative from each of the four (4) councilmember voting districts of the City;

(b) one (1) representative of the Antioch faith-based community;

(c) one (1) representative of the Antioch business community; and

(d) one (1) employee or student of the Antioch Unified School District.

(D) No one shall be excluded from the Police Commission because he or she has a criminal record.

(E) The following shall not be eligible to serve as a Police Commissioner:

(a) current sworn police officer or his/her spouse;

(b) current City employee or his/her spouse;

(c) former Department sworn employee or his/her spouse; or

(d) current or former employee, official, or representative of an employee association representing sworn police officers or his/her spouse.”

Commissioners Training

The resolution also includes training for the commissioners.

“The City shall provide appropriate funding for introductory training of new Police Commission members as well as continuing education for all members. Training shall cover all of the following, but not be limited to:

(A) The ordinance establishing the Police Commission;

(B) National standards of constitutional policing;

(C) Department operations, policies, procedures, practices, and programs;

(D) Laws governing local public records and public meetings, confidentiality, police officer rights, arrestee rights, and excessive force; and

(E) Police policies, practices, and procedures around stops, arrests, use of force, detention, large-scale protests, and marginalized communities.”

 

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Antioch Police to hold Community Forum in Sycamore neighborhood Wednesday May 25

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

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Antioch Mayor Thorpe charged by DA with DUI on April 1, announced May 20

Monday, May 23rd, 2022

“Most DUI cases…take around 60 days” – Ted Asregadoo, PIO, Contra Costa DA’s Office

Questions for Thorpe continue to go unanswered

By Allen D. Payton

Two months after Antioch Mayor Thorpe was arrested for DUI on March 19, the Contra Costa District Attorney’s office announced on Friday, May 20, 2022, that was charged on April 1. Thorpe was charged with two offenses including “Driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage VC 23152 (a)” and “Driving with a .08% blood alcohol content VC 23152 (b)”. See related articles here, here and here.

Following is the press release from Ted Asregadoo, Public Information Officer for the DA’s office:

Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe was charged with two Misdemeanor counts of Driving Under the Influence (DUI) of alcohol on April 1, 2022.

The Office of the District Attorney of Contra Costa County received a referral from the California Highway Patrol on March 23, 2022, on two violations of California Vehicle Code 23152 (a) and 23152 (b) that occurred on March 19, 2022, in Pleasant Hill.

After an evaluation, a charging decision was made on the following counts:

Count 1 – Driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage VC 23152 (a)

Count 2 – Driving with a .08% blood alcohol content VC 23152 (b)

The case has been submitted to the Superior Court of Contra Costa County and a Notice to Appear will be issued by the Court.

DA’s Office Responds to Questions About Timing of Press Release and Charges

The following questions were sent Saturday morning to District Attorney Diana Becton’s personal email and through Asregadoo:

“Why, if Mayor Thorpe was charged on April 1, did you just send out the press release about it, yesterday? Was it favoritism for a political ally? Did he ask you to hold it until after the May 11 deadline for submitting his recall signature petitions? Did you choose to hold it for that reason without his request? Or does the process usually take that long in a DUI case? Are elected officials, either political allies or not, treated like any other person your office prosecutes?”

Asregadoo responded, “To inform the public that misdemeanor charges were issued against Mr. Thorpe April 1, 2022. Last week, some media outlets echoed false claims the DA’s Office was not filing charges. The Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office fairly, ethically, aggressively, and efficiently prosecutes those who violate the law. Most DUI cases (from arrest to issuance of charges) take around 60 days. Sometimes less, sometimes more. It depends on how many DUI cases a Deputy DA is managing. The mission of the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office is to seek justice and enhance public safety for all our residents by fairly, ethically, aggressively, and efficiently prosecuting those who violate the law, and by working to prevent crime.”

Regarding the charges they were asked, “how does your office know Mr. Thorpe only consumed ‘an alcoholic beverage’ that night? Do you have witness testimony from whom he claimed to be having dinner, and/or the server or bartender at the establishment who served them? Do you know for sure that he wasn’t at any other establishment(s) consuming alcoholic beverages with others? Is the second charge a standard charge for a BAC of .08% or higher? Or is that the exact level that the CHP measured in his chemical test they administered to him, that night?”

Asregadoo responded simply, “We don’t comment on evidence related to an active court case.”

Questions for Thorpe Go Unanswered

The following questions were sent Saturday morning to Thorpe via email giving him or his attorney until 3:00 p.m. to respond:

Do you have any comments you would like to include from either you or your attorney?

Also, what was your blood alcohol content that the CHP measured in your chemical test they administered? Was it only .08% as stated in the DA’s press release or was it higher and if so, what was the level?

Why if you were charged on April 1 was this just released by the DA’s office, yesterday? Did you ask them to hold it until after the May 11 recall signature gathering deadline?”

Thorpe was asked additional questions that he had previously been asked but have to date gone unanswered:

“Did you have more than one drink that night? With whom did you have dinner and a drink Friday night/Saturday morning? Is that friend willing to corroborate your claim of you only having one alcoholic beverage?

Where did you eat dinner and have a drink? Will the server or bartender corroborate your story?

How long were you at the establishment? Did you go to more than one restaurant or bar that night? Did you or the person you had dinner with pay with cash or by credit/debit card? Did either one of you keep the receipt(s) from your dinner and drink?

Are you willing to provide copies of the receipt(s) for the public to see to support your claim of only having one drink? At what time do you remember having the drink and finishing it?

Did you consume any alcoholic beverages at those or any restaurants or bars, either in Antioch or anywhere else on Friday, prior to leaving Antioch and East County and arriving at the location where you claim you had dinner with a friend and ‘the drink’?

Who drove you home from the CHP office in Martinez? Were you still inebriated at that time? Have you ever been stopped before for driving under the influence? Have you ever claimed to be inebriated at the time you were accused of another crime?”

No responses were received from Thorpe as of 3:00 p.m., Monday, May 23, 2022.

Please check back later for any updates to this report.

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Thorpe recall fails due to theft of funds, signatures not provided by contracted company

Wednesday, May 11th, 2022

Over $23,000 paid to company, $15,000 contribution from former Assemblyman Jim Frazier

More than enough signatures gathered but not received by committee; policreport to bfiled

City Clerk Householder denies request for extension

Organizers question if Thorpe paid company to not turn over signatures

By Allen D. Payton

Leaders of the effort to recall Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe announced Wednesday that they had failed due to theft of funds by the professional company hired to gather signatures of registered voters which didn’t turn over signatures to the recall committee. Plus, over 1,500 signatures gathered by volunteers submitted to the committee for verification were not returned. Over $23,000 was paid to the company. A total of $45,000 was raised for the effort including $15,000 contributed by former Assemblyman Jim Frazier’s campaign committee in late April.

The following statement was issued:

“The Committee to Recall Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe was unable to submit the required 9,511 signatures needed to put the initiative on the November ballot

Due to various reasons, including Covid and a paid signature company that failed to turn over signed petitions after receiving payment, the recall will not be on the November ballot. Signing efforts during this recall period showcased that close to 11,000 Antioch residents signed the petitions believing that Antioch Mayor Lamar Thorpe is not providing good leadership for the City of Antioch and we thank them for stepping forward.

To be transparent with the community, due to what we believe is criminal activity and fraud by a professional signing company hired to assist us in signature gathering, paid signatures were not turned over or collected after paying over $23,000. In addition, over 1,500 signatures, gathered by volunteers, were delivered to the signature company, paid to validate as registered voters, were not returned.

All funds used for paying for signatures were contributed by residents, businesses and others who support the recall. The signing firm has not been responsive, has skipped town and is believed to be in another state.

Due to the Covid State of Emergency during this recall process, a request was made today to Antioch City Clerk Ellie Householder and Antioch City Attorney Smith to approve an extension, allowing additional days to continue collecting signatures. There is precedence for approving a Covid extension, as seen with the approved extensions to the governor’s recall attempt and other local jurisdictions throughout the state.  Unfortunately, Antioch City Clerk Ellie Householder quickly denied the extension request.

We would like to thank all of the volunteers, contributors and supporters who have participated and encouraged the Recall Antioch Mayor Thorpe effort.

We are now pursuing recourse against the signature gathering company and individuals responsible for what we believe is defrauding members of our community.

As we continue to investigate what transpired, we will be filing a police report with the Antioch Police Department. With this now being on-going investigation, no further public statements will be made as to not interfere with the investigation process.

Regards,Committee to Recall Mayor Lamar Thorpe”

————-

Recall Leaders Share More Details, Question if Thorpe Paid Company Not to Turn Over Signatures

A variety of questions were asked of several recall leaders.

Asked if some of the people hired to gather signatures went unpaid, Kathy Cabrera responded, “Yes, many of the pro signers got stiffed.”

Asked if Householder gave a reason for the denial, committee treasurer Tom Hartrick simply responded, “No.”

When asked if they can appeal Householder’s decision to a judge, Cabrera said, “an attorney we spoke with said that’s not an option.”

Asked why they didn’t pay the signature gathering company as they submitted the signatures to the committee instead of a lump sum, Hartrick replied, “pro signers do draw payments up front.”

Asked if anyone contacted Jim Frazier since most of that $23K came from him?” Hartrick responded, “have not contacted Frazier.”

When asked if the committee is still responsible for paying the signature gatherers for the signatures that they had gathered but weren’t paid for, Lindsey Amezcua responded, “No. The company was responsible for paying the gatherers. They are subcontractors under the company.”

Asked how much was raised and spent by the committee, “Right near $45K” she shared.

Asked if they thought Thorpe had paid the company to not turn over the signatures, Amezcua responded, “yes, I’ve heard from a few people involved that they wouldn’t be surprised if he was involved.” In addition, Cabrera replied, “Oh, yeah, that’s exactly what we thought. Even one of the pro signers thought so, also.”

Questions for Thorpe

The recall committee’s statement and following questions were sent via email to Thorpe Wednesday evening.

“Do you have any comment in response to the failure of the recall against you?

Did your Stop the #KAREN Recall for Mayor Lamar Thorpe 2022 committee pay the signature gathering company more money than what the recall committee was paying them to not turn over the signatures, as some paid signature gatherers have told recall organizers?

Questions for Householder

The following questions were sent to Householder Wednesday night: Recognizing the difficult situation the Thorpe recall leaders are facing why did you deny their request for an extension?

Since you have a clear conflict of interest as the mayor’s self-admitted “best friend” and that you “have each other’s back”, shouldn’t you have recused yourself from the entire process and either allow Deputy City Clerk Christina Garcia to make the decision, the county clerk or the Primo Master Municipal Clerk Stephanie Smith who was going to be brought in for the prima facia signature count, today to handle the extension request?

Questions for Frazier

Attempts to reach Frazier were unsuccessful prior to publication time, asking for any comment about the matter and if he would support an investigation into whether Thorpe paid the company to not turn over the signatures.

As previously reported, to date, Thorpe has only filed an initial Form 410 for his beat the recall committee on Dec. 9, 2021, prior to it being qualified. But he later boasted on his official Facebook page in mid-January that he had raised over $84,000. An Amended Form 410 was due within 10 days after his committee was qualified, which The only confirmation of any funds being contributed to his campaign

Please check back later for any updates to this report.

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Oakley Police Chief, parents of missing Alexis Gabe announce $10,000 reward fund

Thursday, April 28th, 2022

Alexis Gabe’s father Gwyn speaks as his wife, Rowena, Oakley Chief Paul Beard and Detective Tyler Horn look on during the press conference on Thurs., April 28, 2022. (Video screenshot by Allen D. Payton) New poster showing reward.

“Tell us where our daughter is. Help us bring her back home. We need our daughter back.” – Gwyn Gabe, Alexis’ father

Last seen in Antioch on January 26, 2022

By Allen D. Payton

The City of Oakley is offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the whereabouts of Alexis Gabe, the 22-year-old Oakley woman missing since January 26 and last seen in Antioch on Benttree Way by her ex-boyfriend, who remains a person of interest in the case. The Oakley Police Department received a call of a missing person, under suspicious circumstances, on January 27, 2022. Police found Gabe’s car on Trenton Street, a cul-de-sac off Oakley Road. The car was unlocked with the keys inside, according to Oakley police Sgt. Robert Roberts. (See related article)

During a press conference on Thursday, April 28, her parents, Gwyn and Rowena Gabe, Oakley Police Chief Paul Beard and Detective Tyler Horn announced the reward and asked for the public to assist in the efforts to locate her.

A brief, surveillance camera video of a possible suspect was shared showing a man wearing a head covering and COVID-style mask walking in an area four-to-five minutes from where her car was found in Oakley on Jan. 26, 2022. (See video here and here).

Alexis’ Father Says “We Need Our Daughter Back”

During the press conference, Alexis’ father Gwyn spoke of his daughter and pleaded with whomever has information to please come forward.

“It’s been three, long excruciating months since Alexis’ disappearance,” Mr. Gabe said as Mrs. Gabe stood next to him choking back tears. “Since the day our daughter went missing, we’ve questioned our faith, have been completely overwhelmed and filled with doubt and despair. But with the love and support of those around us, we continue to find renewed strength and hope, every day.”

“We know this ordeal has impacted not only our family’s lives, and those who knew her and loved Alexis, but also the lives of the people within the community,” he continued. “Alexis is an amazing woman, daughter, sister and friend. She is genuine, loving, kind, smart and loyal. She is full of wit and humor. She still has so much life, laughter and joy to share.”

“We are pleading to whomever has information regarding Alexis’ disappearance to please come forward,” Mr. Gabe stated. “Please give Alexis the chance to be the person she is meant to be in this world. Tell us where our daughter is. Help us bring her back home. We need our daughter back. Thank you.”

Chief Beard Thanks Antioch PD for Help on His Department’s Biggest Case

Beard spoke next saying, “this is the biggest case my department has had in our relatively short history. We realize this case was bigger than us at a very early stage and we cannot effectively investigate this case had it not been for the assistance of other agencies, such as Antioch PD.” (See video of Chief Beard’s remarks)

“Together Antioch and Oakley PD have worked together, diligently every day of the week since she has been gone, sometimes around the clock,” the chief continued.

“I wish to reiterate that we are still seeking the help of the public, that is the main theme of today’s conference,” Beard stated. “My message to you is we need assistance from the public to help us solve this case and bring Alexis back and bring peace to her family.”

‘The Oakley Police Department, the Antioch Police Department, the City of Oakley all stand in support of the Gabe family,” he concluded.

In response to questions from the media, Beard said “I have dedicated six to seven people on the case.” (See video of Q&A)

Screenshot of security camera video of suspect walking near Alexis’ car on Jan. 26, 2022. Source: Oakley P.D.

Detective Horn Offers Description of Suspect in Video

Horn then had the video of the suspect walking from Alexis’ car shown several times and described him

www.ci.oakley.ca.us/alexisgabeapril28pressconference

“That is the individual we believe that dropped off Alexis’ car,” he said. “He’s about 5’11” to six-foot, skinny build, dark-skinned male with a large overcoat, either a beany or a cap on, sort of an N-95-style mask on with a beard protruding from underneath that mask.”

Anyone with information is asked to call the tip line at 925-625-7009.

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National Prescription Drug TAKE BACK DAY at Antioch Police Dept. Saturday, April 30

Thursday, April 28th, 2022

Keep your family and our community safe. Participate in the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 30 10:00 am-2:00 pm.

With opioid overdose deaths increasing during the pandemic, the Antioch Police Department is taking back unwanted prescription drugs on April 30 at the Antioch Police Facility.

The public can drop off potentially dangerous prescription medications at 300 L Street at the corner of W. 2nd Streets. (front lobby) and other collection sites throughout the county which will adhere to local COVID-19 guidelines and regulations in order to maintain the safety of all participants and local law enforcement.

DEA and its partners will collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms of prescription drugs. Liquids (including intravenous solutions), syringes and other sharps, and illegal drugs will not be accepted. DEA will continue to accept vaping devices and cartridges at its drop off locations provided lithium batteries are removed.

OTHER DROP OFF LOCATIONS

-Office of the Sheriff Muir Station, 980 Muir Road, Martinez

-Office of the Sheriff Bay Station, 5555 Giant Highway, Richmond

-Office of the Sheriff Valley Station, 150 Alamo Plaza, #C, Alamo

-Danville Police Department, 510 La Gonda Way, Danville

-Lafayette Police Department, 3471 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Lafayette

-Orinda Police Department, 22 Orinda Way, Orinda

Helping people dispose of potentially harmful prescription drugs is just one way DEA is working to reduce addiction and stem overdose deaths.

Learn more about the event at www.deatakeback.com, or by calling 800-882-9539.

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