Archive for the ‘Politics & Elections’ Category

Publisher’s comments regarding The Wilson Watch ad in our June print edition

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

By Allen Payton, Publisher

It has come to my attention that some people think the full-page ad about Antioch Councilwoman Monica Wilson who is currently a candidate for Supervisor, entitled “The Wilson Watch” in the June, 2016 issue of the Antioch Herald was paid for by me or was from the Doug Hardcastle for Supervisor campaign. This is to clearly state that it was not paid for by me, nor by anyone associated with Doug Hardcastle or his campaign, for which I am a paid consultant, as I explained in the March, 2016 print edition of the Antioch Herald.

The ad was purchased by a party who chose to place it in the paper, and remain anonymous, which is why I required the words “Paid Advertisement” be placed at the top of the ad.

While the purchaser is not required to be identified, because the ad is not considered a political advertisement under state law, as it does not advocate for or against a candidate, I informed the purchaser that if I am legally required to provide their name(s), I will. They accepted that fact before placing the ad.

Refusing to run such an ad would be considered censorship. However, neither I nor the Antioch Herald accepts any responsibility for the content of the ad.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Antioch Chamber of Commerce CEO, Dr. Sean Wright to run for Mayor

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016
Dr. Sean Wright

Dr. Sean Wright

Dr. Sean Wright, a local chiropractor and the CEO of the Antioch Chamber of Commerce announced his campaign for Mayor of Antioch in the November election.

“I am running for Mayor because this town desperately needs someone with experience and a proven track record in the ability to create lasting change,” Wright said. “Antioch has a rich history that should be celebrated and the potential for a bright future. The speed at which we get to that bright future is dependent on the person who takes over the city’s leadership position. It is crucial for the success of our city and the people who live here, and for our future. I feel confident in my ability to be Mayor, leading us into the future we all desire for Antioch.”

In a press release issued on Wednesday, June 1st, it states: “Five years ago, Dr. Sean Wright took on the challenge of turning around the Antioch Chamber of Commerce, which was on the brink of bankruptcy. Now, he wants to bring that same vision, passion and energy to lead Antioch as Mayor.

As a successful small business owner, Wright feels the need for new leadership and a new direction for Antioch.

His past performance shows his ability to lead collaboratively and create a vision for the future in Antioch. Partnering with leaders from many different areas including elected officials, business, education, volunteers and government staff, his focus was, and remains, on problem solving and creating an environment conducive to future growth and vision.

Programs that Wright has successfully helped initiate include, regional economic development collaboration in the creation of EC2: The Collaborative in partnership with the County’s Northern Waterfront Initiative and Agricultural Growth Initiative which will help to create the needed local jobs to allow more of our residents to live, work and play in our community; Suburban Poverty Task Force bringing the City, County, Police, Code Enforcement, churches, and non-profit organizations together to educate, collaborate and initiate positive campaigns to help those in need and clean up the city; Education reformation at the high school level, helping business leaders and academics work together resulting in programs that are copied state-wide for their success, better preparing our Antioch students for the workforce; and Police support and public safety through the Business Neighborhood Watch program which brings businesses together, helping to police their own areas and supporting our officers.”

“I take great pride in being a resident of Antioch,” says Wright. “Fifteen years ago we purchased a home, and my wife and I and our five children moved here. We opened our chiropractic practice, served in the schools and Kiwanis. I joined the Chamber, becoming Chairman and ultimately CEO, making decisions that were good for the Chamber and businesses.  I volunteered nearly 20 hours a week to create a new purpose and vision and led impactful efforts in education, economic development, public safety and poverty.”

Wright held his campaign kick-off party at his home on Wednesday, June 1st where he says about 60 people attended. On the event’s invitation, his three issues are listed as leadership, safety and economic development, and his slogan reads The Wright Choice for Antioch Mayor. Robin Agopian is listed as his campaign’s treasurer.

Filing for Mayor of Antioch and the city council seats currently held by Mary Rocha and Monica Wilson, opens in July.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Most candidates at District 3 Supervisors forum support fire tax hike, one opposed

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

By Dave Roberts

One of the biggest problems facing East County residents is the lack of adequate fire protection and emergency services. Most of the candidates for county supervisor representing District 3, which includes East County, favor raising taxes to beef up staffing in the East Contra Costa Fire Protection District (ECCFPD). Only one candidate, Doug Hardcastle, has publicly opposed a fire tax hike.

ECCFPD voters have twice rejected fire tax hike measures in recent years. In 2012 a 10-year parcel tax hike, which required two-thirds approval to pass, failed to gain even a majority. In 2015 a benefit assessment, which needed a majority to pass, also failed with 53 percent of voters rejecting it. The district may place another tax hike measure on the November ballot.

In 2008 the fire district was able to staff six fire stations with 48 employees on a $10.8 million budget. But the current $12.1 million budget – a 12 percent increase in funding – only provides for 36 employees and staffing for three fire stations. This has resulted in longer response times, particularly in outlying areas, putting East County residents’ lives and property at risk.

The reason that a 12 percent budget increase in the past eight years has resulted in layoffs and station closures is that employee salary and benefit costs have risen even faster, 15 percent. Most significantly, retirement expenses have increased 64 percent from $2.2 million in 2008 to $3.6 million today.

Four of the six candidates seeking to replace Mary Piepho on the county board of supervisors – Steve Barr, Diane Burgis, Hardcastle and Odessa Lefrancois – discussed the fire district problem at a recent forum in Discovery Bay. The other two candidates – Wade Harper and Monica Wilson – failed to show due to family emergencies, according to Greg Robinson, publisher of the Brentwood Press, which sponsored the forum.

The candidates responded to this question: “Fire protection in East County is an ongoing concern. Despite the fact that there are three stations open with a fourth scheduled to open in July, the voters still turned down a recent tax initiative to support and reopen stations. What do you see as the solution to the ongoing funding for the district, and how can the supervisors help?”

Brentwood City Councilman Barr is the only candidate who has sat on the ECCFPD board, where he’s now in his fourth year.

“I know firsthand what the issues are out here,” he said. “The simple fact is there is not enough funding to fund more than three fire stations. It’s about $2.8 million per station, and the current funding from your property taxes is somewhere around $10 or $11 million. So as you can see, you’re not going to get anything more than three stations.”

The fire board has conducted a study, which determined that the 250-square-mile district actually needs nine fire stations to provide adequate protection, said Barr. He did not do the math at the forum, but nine stations at $2.8 million per station would total $25 million, more than double the district’s current budget.

“So I think we’re on the right track,” he said, adding that he’s “hopeful” about the next tax measure.

Barr did not mention Piepho by name, but he criticized the lack of leadership provided by the county supervisor on the issue.

“The supervisor of this county needs to step up and be the one leading, not the city manager of the city of Brentwood [who is chairing a task force],” he said. “I’m happy he’s doing it because he’s actually looking for solutions, like we all have. And I think that’s exactly what I would expect out of the county supervisors. Not leave it all to one of the cities, but actually leading and showing leadership and finding solutions.”

Oakley City Councilman Hardcastle said the solution is not another tax hike attempt.

“We’ve had enough studies,” he said. “People do not want to raise their taxes again. They tried it twice already. It’s ridiculous that they would even try it twice. We pay too much money. We just need to learn how to spend our money properly where it needs to be spent. I’m there to make sure that that money gets spent like that.”

“I’ve been in business for 40-something years,” Hardcastle continued. “You don’t stay in business for 40-something years by spending money needlessly on stuff that it doesn’t need to be spent on. So my number one priority is going to be conservancy of the money to make sure that our dollars are spent like we want them to spend it.”

Hardcastle did not provide specifics on how he would like to reallocate the fire district’s budget, but said something needs to be done, including increasing salaries.

“Our fire stations out here are in horrible shape,” he said. “These guys are overworked; a lot of them are underpaid. I talked to one guy, he’s [making] $20 an hour being a fireman. That is ridiculous.”

One possibility is continuing the temporary funding provided to the fire district by the county and the cities of Brentwood and Oakley that has allowed the Knightsen station to be reopened through June 2017.

“My number one priority in this whole thing is having our families be safe,” said Hardcastle.  “We can get money from our budgets at the city.”

Lefrancois, who is a past president of the East County NAACP, also favors other government agencies pitching in to help the fire district.

“As a supervisor I’d like to bring all of the concerned parties to the table to try to figure this out,” she said. “This needs to be figured out not just by the county board of supervisor[s], but also by the county board of education and also special district[s] who also have funding on safety that goes into their budget[s].”

Lefrancois also agrees with Barr that another tax hike attempt should be studied. “Maybe we need to figure out from the voters what type of tax, if there is a parcel tax, what would they be willing to pay, what would they be willing to do,” she said. “I think this is a very complex issue, and it needs more than just one individual at the table making that decision.”

East Bay Regional Park District board member Burgis also wants to look at the possibility of another tax hike measure. “We need to find more revenue,” she said. “That can be different tools. That can be property tax, it can be reallocation, it can be consolidation. It can be a whole combination of things. But it has to be legal. And it has to be something that we make urgent.”

She did not mention Barr by name, but criticized the fire board’s efforts thus far.

“The problem has been the leadership on this fire board hasn’t done the job,” said Burgis. “So we need to figure out what hasn’t worked and stop that and move forward. We need to have a more accountable fire protection board. I think that having an elected board that is responsible for the district is a good step.”

Burgis agreed with Barr that there needs to be county leadership on the issue.

“As a supervisor we are one part of three parts: Oakley, Brentwood and the county,” she said. “And as supervisor I would be that leader. I would bring those people together. That’s the reputation I have is bringing people together that have different opinions, politics and agendas and making sure that we do what we need to do. … It’s a problem that we need to deal with.”

On other issues, the candidates mostly agreed that:

  • The proposed Delta tunnels project should be opposed because it would degrade water quality.
  • Development of the Byron Airport could be an economic boon to East County.
  • There is a need to attract more businesses to East County to provide local jobs.
  • Local farmland needs to be protected.
  • Crime, including shootings on Highway 4, needs to be reduced.

The election is June 7th. If no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote, then the top two will face off in the general election in November.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Hardcastle continues to lead in money battle in race for District 3 Supervisor, Burgis close behind in spending

Saturday, May 28th, 2016

By Allen Payton

Candidates and campaigns were required to file financial reports on Thursday, May 26 for the period of April 24 through May 21, 2016. Oakley Councilman Doug Hardcastle continues to lead in the amount of funds raised and spent in the campaign. East Bay Regional Parks District Board Member Diane Burgis is second behind Hardcastle in expenditures, but has the most in monetary contributions, and in unaid bills. But, Brentwood Councilman Steve Barr, has raised more than Burgis in total contributions. Antioch Councilwoman Monica Wilson is in a close fourth in fundraising, in both monetary and total contributions.

Following is the financial information submitted by the candidates in the District 3 Supervisor race for the latest period with their place in each category in parenthesis:

Doug Hardcastle

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $8,297

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $1,675

Total Contributions Received for the period: $9,972 (3rd)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $25,308.16 (4th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $47,483.16 (1st)

Expenditures Made during period: $11,176.07

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $45,818.87 (1st)

Ending Cash Balance: $1,664.29

Outstanding Debts: $15,500 (2nd) – all loans from himself

After his report was submitted, Hardcastle discovered a file of monetary contributions totaling approximately $700 and an in-kind contribution of $750 from a fundraiser in May, that was not included in the latest report. He will be submitting an amended report, this next week.

 

Steve Barr

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $9,100.00 – Most from within the district.

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $1,200

Total Contributions Received for the period: $10,300 (2nd)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $27,785 (2nd)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $38,635 (2nd)

Expenditures Made during period: $28,594, paid down previous unpaid bills of $17,035

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $31,768 (3rd)

Ending Cash Balance: $1,417

Outstanding Debts: $6,550 (3rd) - $5,000 in loans from himself

 

Diane Burgis

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $10,798

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $ -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $10,798 (1st)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,655 (1st)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,755 (3rd)

Expenditures Made during period: $15,336.52

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $8,098.85

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $41,905.38 (2nd)

Ending Cash Balance: $11,220.23

Outstanding Debts: $23,470.06 (1st) - $100 in loans from herself

Almost all of her contributions were received during the period from and most of her money was spent outside of the district.

 

Monica Wilson

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $6,665.16

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $1,927.88

Total Contributions Received for the period: $8,593.04 (4th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $27,075.92 (3rd)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,121.86 (4th)

Expenditures Made during period: $12,704.75 paid down previous unpaid bills of $11,462.87

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $29,215.95 (4th)

Ending Cash Balance of $8,209.89

Outstanding Debts: $3,124.98 (4th)

All of her contributions were received during the period from and most of her money was spent outside of the district, with the majority of it spent out of state for yard signs and direct mail.

 

Odessa Lefrancois

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $1,140.00

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $   -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $1,140.00 (6th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $13,025.00 (5th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $13,025.00 (5th)

Expenditures Made during period: $2,312.22

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $11,590.02 (5th)

Ending Cash Balance of $1,434.98

Outstanding Debts: $ -0-

She will have to file an amended report, as hers does not show the Year to Date Totals on the Summary page.

 

Wade Harper

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $1,675.00

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $   -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $1,675.00 (5th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $9,725.00 (6th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $9,725.00 (6th)

Expenditures Made during period: $3,287.00

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $8,950.54 (6th)

Ending Cash Balance of $774.46

Outstanding Debts: $ -0-

Please see the financial reports, posted below.

Publisher’s Note: For full disclosure and as explained in the March issue of the Antioch Herald, I, the writer of this article, am the paid consultant for Doug Hardcastle’s campaign for County Supervisor.

Barr 460 0424-52116

Burgis 460 0424-052116

Hardcastle 460 0424-052116

Harper 460 0424-052116

Lefrancois 460 0424-052116

Wilson 460 0424-052116

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Former Save Mt. Diablo leader endorses Burgis for Supervisor

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Editor:

District 3 needs to elect a champion for our environment and quality of life for people living in the county.  Diane Burgis – executive director of Friends of Marsh Creek Watershed and an elected Member of the East Bay Regional Park District Board of Directors – has a record of success in protecting the Delta, agricultural lands, open spaces, and wildlife.

Diane was recently inducted into the County Women’s Commission Hall of Fame.  She was named the Contra Costa Watershed Champion for her work in inspiring others to conserve our environment. She has been involved in the East Contra Costa Habitat Conservancy for eight years and served on the Delta Protection Commission.  No other candidate has the environmental leadership experience she offers. The League of Conservation Voters and Retired Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan endorse Diane, along with numerous environmental leaders including myself.

Voters that care about water, open spaces, and agricultural lands need to elect Diane Burgis for Contra Costa Supervisor.  She is the best candidate to represent residents of our community.  Visit her website at DianeBurgis.com.

Ron Brown

Retired Executive Director, Save Mount Diablo

Walnut Creek

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

East County group seeking solutions to fire district funding endorse Hardcastle for Supervisor

Thursday, May 26th, 2016
Members of the East County Voters for Equal Protection Phil Mora, Hal Bray, Rob Broocker and Bob Bay, with Doug Hardcastle (center) at the closed fire station in Discovery Bay.

Members of the East County Voters for Equal Protection Phil Mora, Hal Bray, Rob Broocker and Bob Bay, with Doug Hardcastle (center) at the closed fire station in Discovery Bay.

The East County Voters for Equal Protection (ECVEP), a group of residents who are working to find ways to fund the East Contra Costa Fire Protection District without a tax increase, have endorsed Oakley Councilman Doug Hardcastle in his race for Supervisor in District 3, for his support of their efforts.

The group supports reallocation of funds that other local agencies within the district boundaries, currently receive in property tax revenue. The fire protection district includes Oakley, Brentwood, Discovery Bay, Bethel Island, Byron and Knightsen, as well as the unincorporated areas of Clayton along Marsh Creek and Morgan Territory Roads.

“This can has been kicked down the road too many times,” said Rob Broocker, the group’s leader. “Doug recognizes that it’s time the local officials sat down and worked things out.”

Sign in the window of the closed Discovery Bay fire station.

Sign in the window of the closed Discovery Bay fire station.

At a recent meeting with Hardcastle at a closed fire station, in Discovery Bay, Broocker, a Santa Clara firefighter, painting contractor and Discovery Bay resident said, “Of two Discovery Bay Fire Stations one is closed. Even with a tax increase the second one can’t be guaranteed to be open, according to County Assessor Gus Kramer. At the same Discovery Bay Town Council meeting David Piepho said it will never be open due to the lack of funding.”

The group has met with board members and spoken before their meetings, as well communicated with other community leaders like Hardcastle, to get them to consider a reallocation plan instead of a third attempt at a tax increase.

“I appreciate the support of the East County Voters and look forward to continuing to work with them to find a solution to improving fire protection, without another tax increase,” Hardcastle said. “Our number one priority is safety of our families. You have to take this personal. You have to ask yourself, what if it was my house on fire or one of my family members in an accident? We deserve quicker response times for all of us.”

Speaking of the only current ECCFP board member who is also a candidate in the District 3 Supervisor’s race, Broocker stated “Steve Barr is not ready to step up and be a Supervisor if he can’t handle the job on the fire district board.”

At a candidates’ forum in Discovery Bay, Wednesday night, Barr said, “There is a task force that’s been formed. The first step the fire board has taken is do a study to find out what is the adequate number of fire stations in this district. That study, came in with a nine-station model. I think we’re on the right track. I’m hopeful this next measure or however it comes to you will be right.”

Hardcastle disagrees.

“We’ve had enough studies,” he responded. “People do not want to raise their taxes again. They tried it twice, already. It’s ridiculous they even tried it twice. We just need to learn how to spend our money properly.”

While the ECVEP is asking all the agencies within the bounds of the fire district to pitch in, Hardcastle only supports reallocating funds from the cities of Oakley and Brentwood, and the County, like was done with one-time money to re-open the fire station in Knightsen.

“I feel the only ones that have the ability to approve reallocation of money are our councils and the county,” he stated. “We just did it by funding the Knightsen fire station to get them open for 2017.”

That process was explained by another member of the group.

“When the self-appointed Task Force made their initial report to the fire board on October 21, 2015, they recommended emergency funding to open one fire station for a limited period of time,” stated Bryan Scott, a member of ECVEP. “They sought and obtained one-time funding from the cities of Brentwood and Oakley as well as the county.”

“The Task Force allocated the contributions from the cities and the county based on call volume to their respective areas,” he continued. “This came out to 49% for the city of Brentwood, 28% for the city of Oakley, and 23% for the county.”

“Using these same allocation percentages to increase fire district funding by $7.8 million would mean Brentwood would contribute $3,822,000, Oakley would contribute $2,184,000, and the county $1,794,000,” Scott explained.

Brentwood will pay a larger portion for two reasons. First, because they have a larger population than Oakley. Second, they receive a greater percentage of property tax, 16% than Oakley does at just 7%. Plus, they used part of funds set aside for fire protection on their police force, instead.

“We need the cities and county to pitch in to make this happen and in a fair way,” Hardcastle added. “It’s time to get this done.”

District 3 includes all of Oakley, Brentwood, Discovery Bay, Bethel Island, Byron, Knightsen and most of Antioch in East County, as well as Blackhawk, Diablo and Camino Tassajara in the San Ramon Valley. The election is June 7. For more information about Doug Hardcastle, visit www.doughardcastle.com or call the Campaign Headquarters at (925) 755-5053.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Union, developer money in large contribution reports for District 3 Supervisor candidates, committees

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

By Allen Payton

Campaigns are required to file reports of contributions received by their campaigns of $2,000 or more, within 24 hours of receiving them, between March 9 and June 7, 2016. The rules changed in the county, this year, increasing from $1,000 to $2,000. However, the form provided by the County Elections Office had the old information on it and some candidates weren’t informed of the change. So, some of their reports reflect contributions of less than $2,000.

Some of the contributions that can be seen in the reports, known as 497 forms, below have been reported previously, on the regularly scheduled financial reports – 460 forms – for the period January 1 through April 23, 2016.

On the 497 forms submitted by each candidate and political action committee, they show East Bay Regional Parks District Board Member Diane Burgis received the most in reportable contributions, since the last, regular reporting period, with $2,000 from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (I.B.E.W.) 302 Community Candidates PAC which is based in Martinez, $2,000 from the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers Local 21 TJ Anthony PAC Fund based in San Francisco and $1,675 from the Plumbers & Steamfitters Local Union #342, which is based in Concord.

The I.B.E.W. 497 report shows both the contribution to Burgis, as well as a $2,000 contribution to the campaign committee for Lori Ogorchock for Mayor – 2016. Filing for the election for Mayor of Antioch doesn’t open until July.

The 497’s also show both Antioch Mayor Wade Harper and Antioch Councilwoman Monica Wilson (which she previously reported) received the maximum contribution of $1,675 from Richland Communities, a developer seeking to build between 1,100 and 1,600 homes in the Sand Creek area near Kaiser on Deer Valley Road in Antioch.

Wilson’s 497’s also show the previously reported contribution of $5,000 from the California Nurses Association PAC, the maximum allowed by a broad based political action committee.

Oakley Councilman Doug Hardcastleshowed a $1,500 loan to himself that he previously reported. Neither Brentwood Councilman Steve Barr nor NAACP East County Branch President Odessa Lefrancois submitted any 497 forms.

The latest reporting period ended this last Saturday, May 21 and 460 form reports are due this Thursday, May 26. Contributions of $100 or more will appear on those forms.

District 3 includes most of Antioch.

Burgis 497′s

Hardcastle 497

Harper 497′s

Wilson 497′s

IBEW 497 – Burgis & Ogorchock

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Contra Costa Deputy Sheriffs contribute $40,000 to help Avila Farias in District 5 Supervisor race

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

By Allen Payton

Campaigns are required to file reports of contributions received by their campaigns of $2,000 or more, within 24 hours of receiving them, between March 9 and June 7, 2016. The rules changed in the county, this year, increasing from $1,000 to $2,000. However, the form provided by the County Elections Office had the old information on it and some candidates weren’t informed of the change. So, some of their reports reflect contributions of less than $2,000.

Some of the contributions that can be seen in the reports, known as 497 forms, below have been reported previously, on the regularly scheduled financial reports – 460 forms – for the period January 1 through April 23, 2016.

Martinez Vice Mayor Anamarie Avila Farias and Supervisor Federal Glover were the only candidates to submitted the 497 forms.

However, the specifically formed Contra Costa Families for Responsible Leadership Supporting Anamarie Avila Farias for Supervisor committee submitted a 497 report showing it had received $35,000 from the Contra Costa County DSA (Deputy Sheriffs Association) Independent Expenditure PAC. Of those funds $12,908.60 was spent for the design, printing and postage for a mailer in support of Avila Farias and another $15,000 on research, which could be for polling, as reported on the newly formed committee’s 496 Independent Expenditure Report.

The Deputy Sheriffs also contributed the maximum of $5,000 directly to Avila Farias’ campaign committee which she reported on a 497 report.

So far those are the largest contribution and independent expenditures of anyone or organization in reported in the District 5 Supervisor’s race.

When asked if she had any comment on the large amount of money spent on her behalf, Avila Farias  replied “I can’t control outside spending for me or against me. So, I don’t pay attention to it.”

“I’m concentrating on my efforts to meet voters by going door-to-door, through phone calls and the mailbox and it’s going very well,” she added.

Her 497 reports also show new contributions, since the last reporting period, of $1,675 from Service Employees International Union Local 1021 Candidate PAC, $1,675 each from DeNova Homes in Concord and Lori Sanson of Walnut Creek, $1,600 each from General Contractor James Busby and Scott Busby Construction, $1,000 from International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers (IFPTE) Local 21 TJ Anthony PAC Fund. Her reports also show previously reported contributions of $5,000 from the United Professional Fire Fighters of Contra Costa County and $1,675 from Antioch Councilman Tony Tiscareno.

Glover’s reports

Glover also submitted 497’s showing new contributions of $5,000 from the California Nurses Association PAC, $4,000 from the Building Industry Association’s BUILD JOBS PAC, $1,675 from the Teamsters’ DRIVE Committee in Washington DC, $1,675 from the Contra Costa Coalition for Business and Jobs, $1,650 from the Pittsburg Police Benefit Association, $1,000 from the Northern California District Council of Laborers PAC, and $1,675 each from a variety of individuals and businesses including, County Clerk Joe Canciamilla’s campaign committee, Dr. Laura Canciamilla’s school board campaign committee, and an accounting firm in Carson City, Nevada that specializes in the solid waste industry.

Glover’s reports also show previously reported large contributions of $5,000 from the IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers) Local Union 302 PAC, $2,000 from the Operating Engineers Local 3, $1,675 from U.A. (United Association) Local 342 P.A.C. Fund, $1,500 from the Northern California Carpenters Regional Council, $1,000 from the Laborers International Union of North America Local No. 324, $2,000 from Bisio and Dunivan, a property management company in Martinez, and another $1,000 from Joanne Dunivan-Bisio at the same address as Bisio and Dunivan.

The latest reporting period ended this last Saturday, May 21 and 460 reports are due this Thursday, May 26. Contributions of $100 or more will appear on those forms.

District 5 includes most of the section of Antioch north of Highway 4.

Avila Farias 497′s

Glover 497′s

IE supporting Avila Farias 497 & 496

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter