Archive for the ‘Pets & Animals’ Category

Get photos of your pet with Santa at Somersville Towne Center, Saturday, Dec. 10

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

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Antioch Animal Services to honor military veterans, November 11th & 12th

Friday, November 4th, 2016

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Adoption fee waivers for veterans

Antioch Animal Services will be expressing their gratitude to the men and women who have served our country by honoring them in the Antioch Veteran’s Day Parade, Friday, November 11th, in Antioch. Several Shelter Staff & Volunteers, many who are Veterans themselves, will march in the parade accompanied by dogs available for adoption from Antioch Animal Services.

The Celebration of Thanks continues on Saturday, November 12th from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the facility located at 300 L St in Antioch, where Antioch Animal Services will be waiving the Adoption Fee on any pet adopted by a Current or Former Member of the Military or Qualified Dependent. The waived Adoption Fee includes: spay/neuter, microchip and shots. Proof of military service must be presented in the form of Military ID, Veterans Administration ID, Military Dependent ID or DD214.

Available pets can be viewed at the facility or on-line at: shelterme.com/antiochanimalservices. The staff and volunteers at Antioch Animal Services are grateful to those who have given so freely of themselves by serving our great nation.

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Special discounts on pet adoptions during Antioch Police & Animal Services Halloween event, Saturday

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

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Antioch Animal Services, VIP Petcare to offer vax, adoption specials, Saturday, Oct. 15

Monday, October 10th, 2016

Antioch Animal Services in conjunction with VIP PetCare will be providing low cost vaccinations and preventative care services on Saturday, October 15th from 11 am to 2 pm at Antioch Animal Services, located at 300 L Street at the corner of West 2nd Streets in downtown Antioch. All dogs must be on a leash and cats must be in carriers.

VIP Pet Care will be giving FREE Rabies Vaccinations to DOGS ONLY. In addition, Saturday, October 15th will be AMNESTY DAY at Antioch Animal Services for any residents who have an overdue/delinquent dog license. You will only be required to pay for the license. All overdue/delinquent fees will be forgiven throughout the day. This is a great service for our community.

In addition they will be holding Happy Chi-lloween on Saturday, October 15th. All Chihuahua and Chihuahua Mixes will have a Reduced Adoption Fee of $25 to Qualified Homes.* The adoption fee includes: spay/neuter, microchip and shots. Please see flyer, below.

*Must present valid government issued ID, proof of home ownership (or lease with pet clause if renting), ALL household members, including canine, must be present for meet and greet.

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Antioch Council discusses housing for homeless, votes to bring in ARF to help Animal Shelter

Friday, October 7th, 2016

arf-logoBy Nick Goodrich

During its meeting on Tuesday, September 27th, the Antioch City Council heard a report from Assemblyman Jim Frazier, discussed housing for the city’s homeless, and  voted to bring in Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF) to provide help for its struggling animal shelter.

Frazier’s Report

To open the meeting, Council hosted Assemblyman Jim Frazier, who provided an update on his recent legislative activities in the California State Assembly and sought support for his transportation funding proposal.

Frazier was pleased to note the completion of the Highway 4 corridor widening project, which he has worked for since his time on Transplan, the East County division of the Contra Costa Transportation Authority.

The project, which amounted to $1.3 billion through the county’s half-cent sales tax measure and state funds, created over 12,000 jobs and employed more than 40 local businesses.

“We have infrastructure in poor shape. It’s horrible, it’s crumbling,” he said. As the chairman of the Transportation Committee in California, Frazier said he has made it his mission to create and support various transportation projects in the state.

He reported that he has been working with his colleagues, local communities, and industry experts to develop an all-inclusive plan that would help make major improvements to California’s transportation and infrastructure.

“By strengthening trade corridors and improving the movement of goods, this proposal keeps businesses in California,” he told the Council.

In addition, Frazier’s plan calls for an additional $7.4 billion annually to be designated for transportation in the state. It includes increases to the tax on gas and diesel, as well as to the vehicle license registration fee.

He called on Antioch residents and citizens throughout California to show their enthusiasm for his plan by writing letters of support to their local newspapers and representatives.

“Let’s make transportation funding a priority this year,” he said.

Public Hearing: Priorities for Housing and Homeless

Council also oversaw a public hearing on priorities for Antioch’s homeless population. The city’s plan, which began with a study session in August of this year, includes providing a grant program for mobile home owners and seeking County funds to support homeless outreach.

Outreach to Antioch’s homeless will soon see an increase, as at least one County-funded outreach team will begin operating mostly in the East Bay—namely, Pittsburg, Antioch, etc. All homeless outreach in Contra Costa will be funded by the County, but Antioch has still managed to allocate $38,000 for the fiscal year in order to resolve the issue of homelessness in the city.

The Council is expected to allocate extra money toward increased outreach as needed—for example, if a second outreach team is deemed necessary, the city will contribute to the County’s funding to help make that happen. Or, an outreach team that operates in the evening will be given the funding to allow it to operate for more hours during the week.

An East County care center, designed to replace the resource center that used to work with the Don Brown shelter on 4th Street, was tentatively approved for County funding to the tune of over $660,000.

East County is currently the only County location that does not have a multi-resource center. A suitable location is still in the works, however, and funding for the center won’t be available for the next 8-10 months.

Mayor Pro Tem Lori Ogorchock made sure to clarify that, if the city needs to, it can always designate more than its current $38,000 to help out.

“I just want to make sure our hands aren’t tied,” she said.

Animal Rescue Foundation Steps In

The Council then discussed a Memorandum of Understanding for a partnership with Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF).

ARF has agreed to provide the Antioch Animal Shelter with services and expertise in key areas for a one-year period, at no cost to the City. The partnership comes on the heels of months of complaints about the state of Antioch’s Animal Shelter, by many residents.

During the Council’s last meeting, Antioch Police Chief Allan Cantando presented a list of options for the city to consider to begin addressing some of the issues the shelter faces, such as funding shortages and a lack of trained professionals. Seeking outside help was among them.

Several residents from the surrounding area stated their satisfaction with the ARF partnership, including Louise McGuire, a resident of Concord, where ARF has run a successful shelter for years.

“I applaud the Memorandum of Understanding,” McGuire told the Council. “I hope that this resolution will benefit the lives of the animals in the shelter, and also the people the people that care for them.”

Karen Kopps, President of HARP, the Homeless Animals Response Program, was happy with the news.

“I’m also delighted that this update is being done now, and not in early 2017,” she stated. “So, thank you.”

An initial meeting and walk through of the shelter will be conducted with ARF soon, the council reported. That will allow ARF to determine the number of staff and number of hours they will provide.

Harper was happy to give the community a concrete course of action after continued complaints about the shelter.

“TherResolution is not yet a detailed plan,” he said. “But it looks like we’re attempting to take steps move forward. We’re listening. We still have a responsibility to make improvements…Now it’s time for us to start making those improvements.”

The resolution to approve the understanding with ARF was approved by Council in a unanimous 5-0 vote.

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Hot Rods 4 Paws car show, animal adoptions, Saturday, October 22

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

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County Animal Services temporarily ceases acceptance of owner surrendered animals

Monday, February 1st, 2016

County shelters experiencing overcrowding due to increased owner surrenders, department developing intervention program to support families in keeping animals in their homes

Effective Wednesday, February 3rd, Contra Costa County Animals Services Department (CCCASD) will be temporarily ceasing the acceptance of owner surrendered animals at their shelters in Martinez and Pinole due to the volume of animals at both facilities. Certain exceptions to this temporary freeze will be made for animals that are injured, unhealthy, under twelve weeks of age, or as otherwise required by law. The agency has also indefinitely closed its night deposit boxes for animals that are surrendered during hours that the department is closed to the public.

“Surrendering an animal to the shelter should be a last resort,” says Beth Ward, Contra Costa County Animal Services’ Director.  “High owner surrender rates leads to overpopulation in our shelters, which increases the possibilities that animals will get disease and/or experience behavior problems. Properly managing shelter inventory and the health of the pets in our care improves the chances of finding homes for the animals in our care.”

CCCASD expects this temporary freeze on accepting owner surrendered animals to be in effect for roughly a month, during which time the department will be developing an intervention program to help support families in keeping their animals in their homes. During this period, CCCASD will continue to receive and impound animals that are sick, injured or abandoned, as well as strays and animals that are confiscated as a result of active investigations or impounded by other law enforcement agencies in Contra Costa County.

Families in need can email asdweb@asd.cccounty.us or call (925) 335-8300 to determine if CCCASD can accept their pet. There is a fee of $50.00 for unlicensed animals surrendered by their owners. The fee for surrendering a licensed animal is $30.00.

County residents can visit www.ccasd.org to view a list of online resources to support them in keeping their pets.

To adopt a pet, call them at (925) 335-8300 or visit the shelter at 4800 Imhoff Place in Martinez.

Contra Costa Animal Services is the largest animal welfare organization in Contra Costa County. The department operates two shelters, in Martinez and Pinole, where they provide high-quality animal care services, shelter homeless, abandoned and lost animals, place animals in safe, caring homes, and provide education and services to enhance the lives of people and their animal companions. Additionally, the department’s Field Services Division plays a crucial role in protecting the health and safety of all people and animals in our community through enforcement of state and laws, protecting the public from animal injury and working to prevent animal cruelty, abuse and neglect.

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City resisting help for Antioch’s newest neighborhood with noisy, messy roosters, until now

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015
A few of the many roosters in the neighborhood can be seen roaming at the corner of Viera Avenue and Bown Lane at 6:45 am on Saturday, November 22, 2015.

A few of the many roosters in the neighborhood can be seen roaming at the corner of Viera Avenue and Bown Lane at 6:45 am on Saturday, November 22, 2015.

By Allen Payton

For the past three years, Kurt Loomis and his neighbors have been living with a growing flock of noisy, messy roosters in their neighborhood.

Caught between the county and the city, while the two agencies were in the midst of annexing the area into the city limits, Loomis tried everything to get rid of the birds and get some help from those who represent him.

More roosters at the end of Vine Lane.

More roosters at the end of Vine Lane.

He met with city staff, gathered  signatures on a petition from 19 of his neighbors as instructed, called the mayor and three of the four council members, spoke at a council meeting, but still nothing happened.

But, in phone conversations with Mayor Wade Harper, Mayor Pro Tem Lori Ogorchock and Council Members Mary Rocha and Tony Tiscareno, this past week, they all committed to doing something to help solve the problem.

The city received $1 million for the annexation, and it has been suggested the Council use part of those funds to pay to trap the birds. Harper said the city received a quote of $7,000.

“Definitely those issues are things the council can deal with providing some assistance and funding to address that,” Harper said. “If someone wants to bring it to council and agendize it we can deal with it.”

 

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