Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Antioch man shoots, kills himself following Hwy 4 CHP chase for DUI, Thursday night

Friday, January 13th, 2017

Pursuit began in Pittsburg, ended in Concord

Thursday night, January 12, 2017 at about 11 pm, CHP began a DUI investigation of a driver suspected of driving impaired at Harbor Court and Harbor Street in the city of Pittsburg. The driver showed signs of impairment and CHP requested him to exit his vehicle for a DUI investigation. The driver refused to exit and fled the scene prompting CHP to pursue him on westbound Highway 4.

CHP pursued the Honda sedan as he exited Port Chicago Highway, drove to and parked in a driveway located on Gratton Way in Concord. At that point, two CHP units and a CHP supervisor were parked behind the suspect vehicle. While still in his Honda, the suspect (a 45-year-old white male from Antioch) brandished a semi automatic pistol, turned it on himself, discharged it and suffered a self-inflicted wound and subsequently killed himself.

No CHP Officers were injured nor did any CHP officers fire their weapons. CHP’s Golden Gate Divisions Special Investigative Unit (SIU) is conducting a full investigation. This is still an open investigation. A call into the CHP Contra Costa for the suspect’s name and any other details was not returned before press time and that is all the information the CHP has released as of now.

 

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County Public Works Dept. says closed county roads to reopen Friday by 5:00 p.m.

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Alhambra Valley Road ClosureContra Costa County plans to reopen the following roads by 5:00 p.m. on January 13, 2017.

  • Marsh Creek Road between the Clayton city limits and Deer Valley Road
  • Morgan Territory Road between Marsh Creek Road and Manning Road
  • McEwen Road between Highway 4 and Carquinez Scenic Drive

The closures wererequired due to mudslides and flooding concerns. Alhambra Valley Road between Bear Creek Road and Castro Ranch Road is closed indefinitely. Signs and message boards will alert drivers of the closure. There is not an estimated timeframe for reopening Alhambra Valley Road at this time.Drivers are encouraged to use the routes on the map below as alternate routes for Alhambra Valley Road.

If you’re concerned about flooding at your home or business, it’s not too late to visit one of the free sandbag stations located throughout the county.  Please note that you’ll need to bring a shovel, but bags and sand are available for free.   Find out details regarding County sandbag sites at www.cccounty.us/sandbags.

County Public Works Maintenance road crews maintain the storm drain inlets through a program of annual inspection and cleaning. To report a clogged catch basin or drainage inlet please call the Public Works Maintenance Division at 925-313-7000 during work hours and after hours call Sheriff’s Dispatch at 925-646-2441.

Important phone numbers and webpages:

(925) 313-7000 Public Works Maintenance Division- For emergencies during normal business hours

(707) 551-4100 California Highway Patrol- For emergencies after hours

(925) 646-2441 Contra Costa County Sheriffs Dispatch- For emergencies after hours

http://www.cccounty.us/sandbags   -  Contra Costa County Sand Bag Locations

http://www.cccounty.us/5906/Winter-Storm-Preparedness-Winter Storm Preparedness

http://www.co.contra-costa.ca.us/5895/Flooding-Information-Flood Information

http://www.cccounty.us/332/FEMA-Floodplain-Program- FEMA Floodplain Program

http://www.contracosta.ca.gov/1578/Flood-Forecast-Information-How to Flood Forecast

http://www.co.contra-costa.ca.us/5907/Flood-Preparedness-California Flood Preparedness

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Despite bankruptcy warning, Antioch Council affirms $9.2 million pay, benefits hike

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Mayor Wright: “These are contracts that are going to hurt us going forward”

By Dave Roberts

A City Council majority on Tuesday granted more than $9 million in pay and benefit increases to city employees over five years, despite warnings from residents that it could lead to bankruptcy and concerns from the two newest council members that it could put the city in a financial bind when the city’s Measure C half-cent sales tax revenue expires in 2021.

The previous council in November unanimously passed the compensation package in the form of tentative agreements. Tuesday’s action, which was approved by the three council members who previously voted for it while new members Mayor Sean Wright and Councilman Lamar Thorpe abstained, approved the memoranda of understanding that made the tentative agreements official.

The compensation package will cost the city $1,844,285 in the current fiscal year, which adds up to $9.2 million over the length of the contracts, although the cost will be higher due to future pay increases. About 80% of the compensation increase will go to the police, including a 4.5% wage hike for sworn officers and 2.5% for non-sworn officers. Other union groups, including confidential employees, engineers and management, will receive annual pay hikes of 2-3%. Various retirement and educational benefit increases are also included.

Two members of the public pleaded with the council to not grant the compensation hike, warning that it could plunge the city into bankruptcy, which the city flirted with during the depth of the Great Recession.

“Council, I implore you to vote down these contracts,” said Marty Fernandez. “You’re supposed to represent the citizens of Antioch – not the unions, not the employees, but the citizens. Your own financial director says that we are headed for bankruptcy in a couple years. This will jet propel us into bankruptcy. A few years ago one of the smartest men I know, [former] Councilman Gary Agopian, said during the contract negotiations that wages should be frozen and let’s take a good look at the big picture. This is truer now than it ever was.

“I beg the five of you to freeze wages and hiring and take a good long look at the finances and the future of this city. This is probably the most important vote this council will ever take. If you want Measure C extended, the city has to tighten its belt and not give away the farm and hope for the best. Because the voters of Antioch are not stupid. They are watching you. And no amount of money or signs will convince them to give you more money.

“Start with a one-year contract and a 2% raise for everyone if you have to give them, and see where you are at financially. And then do another one-year contract until the city is on stable ground. CalPERS is about to hit you with a huge increase in contributions because of the losses that they have incurred. We don’t even pay what we need to pay now. We are in debt to CalPERS for millions.

“To council members who previously voted for this contract, you now have had time to read it and understand what you voted for. You can change your vote and have the respect of the citizens of Antioch. It’s OK to make a mistake if you correct it. Don’t let your mouths write a check that your buttockses can’t cash.”

Former Councilman Ralph Hernandez echoed Fernandez’s remarks.

“I think you need to put off approval of this,” he said. “You need to really look at where is the money at. How are you going to pay for these things? These are not stable expenditures; these are increases that are being proposed and negotiated. You cannot continue to spend and expect good results. The city owes over $100 million in pension debt alone.

“Antioch is, according to FBI reports, the 12th most dangerous city in Northern California. Doesn’t that shock you? Doesn’t that make you want to spend the money more on public safety versus wages and benefit increases across the board? You need basically to take a second look at all of these contracts. Can you afford it? According to city finance and a lot of the records that have come out, you’re headed toward bankruptcy. So if you’re headed toward bankruptcy, do you add more debt? Is that really a smart thing for you up there to do? I don’t think you’re stupid up there.

“I just think that you need to take a new longer term look at all of these contracts. You need to really discuss the implications and the consequences with the employee groups and say, ‘We cannot afford these things.’ Also the city of Antioch needs to quit comparing salaries and benefits and what not with other communities, especially in Contra Costa County. The ability to pay for these things is not equal to the other communities. There was a grand jury report a few years back that basically said that. They suggest that you should also look at contracting certain city services in order to save money.”

Although Wright and Thorpe abstained from voting on the compensation package, they both expressed concern that it was not a wise commitment by their fellow council members along with former members Mayor Wade Harper and Councilwoman Mary Rocha. The Measure C sales tax hike, which has raised more than $13 million since it went into effect in April 2014, is scheduled to expire in 2021 just before the new employee contracts expire.

“There is no money to fund these beyond [the expiration of Measure C],” said Thorpe. “So that is very, very, very concerning to me.” He added that he believes the increased educational compensation benefit to be excessive. “So that’s concerning to me. There’s a whole lot of things that were concerning to me, and I’ll have a difficult time voting for it if I was in the position to do so.”

Thorpe and Wright said they decided to abstain from voting because they were not on the council when the contracts were negotiated with the city employee unions.

Wright said he was told by City Attorney Michael Vigilia and by another attorney that the November vote by the council approving the tentative agreements was legally binding. Failing to ratify those agreements would set the city up for litigation if the employee unions sued – a lawsuit that the city would lose, he said. But Wright indicated he would have liked to have voted against the contracts if it did not incur that legal liability.

“These are contracts that are going to hurt us going forward,” he said. “[I agree with] those that see them as being financially binding to us as a city, they are tying our hands. We are going to be in a rough place. [If renewal of] Measure C does not pass, we are not going to be able to afford these contracts.”

But Councilman Tony Tiscareno dismissed that concern, saying that the council followed the correct contract bargaining process with the city employee unions.

“I’ve been hearing similar complaints and comments throughout my residency here in the city of Antioch,” he said. “There’s a process that’s got to be done. The city of Antioch has to bargain with their employees, whether it’s the police department or the public works department. We have to bargain in good faith with our employees, and we believe we’ve done so. We believe, in my opinion, that we stayed within a budget that was controllable. So I have no qualms about working with our police department and our other workers to provide the great services here in the city of Antioch.

“I think we are doing the right thing. We have one of the best police forces, I believe, in the state of California. They are risking their lives, and they’re not making a whole lot of money. You start seeing a lot of these wages, I think it’s due because we are understaffed and a lot of these folks are working overtime and risking their lives just to provide a safe city out here.

“So I give it to our employees that are providing a service here. Whether some people believe they deserve what they earn, I believe that they do. I think the city has listened and provided all the information to the council so we can make a good decision based on the information that we have gotten. I was comfortable when we were able to approve the MOUs for all the bargaining units.”

Councilwoman Lori Ogorchock agreed with Tiscareno.

“I too feel strongly that the process that we have done in negotiating these contracts, we did do it in good faith,” she said. “We did listen to all parties. I believe we negotiated fairly for the city. I believe the city is moving in a very positive direction. I see a lot of change in the city, and I see a lot of positive change. So therefore, I’m pleased with the way this is going. I understand that there’s a lot of people that’s not [in agreement]. But I’m pleased with this process.”

Councilwoman Monica Wilson, who cast the deciding third vote to approve the contracts, did not speak on the issue. In November she defended the council’s action in response to a charge that it was playing politics by favoring employee unions’ interests over that of city residents.

“When we first came on [the council in 2014] we were only at a four-day work week,” she said. “And we worked really hard to get you guys back to work. And I know a lot of you guys made sacrifices. So to say it was a political move, I really don’t get that. That’s so far from the truth. We all worked really hard and worked really long hours negotiating in good faith. So I do not have a problem tonight going through with all these bargaining unit contracts.”

In other action, the council:

  • Listened to a report from Contra Costa County Fire Protection District officials who want to work with city officials to increase fees on new development to pay for fire protection services.
  • Listened to a report from a consultant on the options for implementing a fee on new development to pay for transportation improvements needed to accommodate that development.
  • Declined to act on a request from Police Chief Allan Cantando to replace a police officer position with a police sergeant position.
  • Directed Cantando to make it a priority to place surveillance cameras at the intersection of 18th Street and Cavallo Road.
  • Asked that the city’s Facebook page provide more information on city events, but that it not be changed to encourage more citizen input on city issues.
  • Directed the finance director to more clearly show in the city budget how much Measure C revenue is going to the police department. Editor’s Note: Look for a further article on this matter.

 

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Burgis sworn in as new County Supervisor, announcing final term Glover becomes new Board Chair for 2017

Thursday, January 12th, 2017
Former Congressman George Miller administers the oaths of office to new Contra Costa County Supervisor Diane Burgis, left, and re-elected Supervisors Federal Glover and Candace Andersen, Tuesday, January 10, 2017 as Supervisors Karen Mitchoff and John Gioia look on. photos by Jonathan Bash

Former Congressman George Miller administers the oaths of office to new Contra Costa County Supervisor Diane Burgis, left, and re-elected Supervisors Federal Glover and Candace Andersen, Tuesday, January 10, 2017 as Supervisors Karen Mitchoff and John Gioia look on. Photos by Jonathan Bash

By Veronica Hampton

Diane Burgis became a new member of the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors, and re-elected Supervisor Federal Glover was voted in as Chair of the Board for this year, during the board meeting on Tuesday, January 10. During the procedures, Glover announced this will be his last term on the board.

The meeting began with the presentation of colors by veterans groups from Pittsburg and Martinez. Oakley veteran, Randy “Smitty” Smith, led the Pledge of Allegiance and county Senior Deputy Administrator Julie Enea led in the singing of the National Anthem. Re-elected District 2 Supervisor and out-going Chair for 2016, Candace Andersen opened with an inspirational thought for the day by Michelangelo.

“The greater danger for most of us isn’t that our aim is too high and miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it,” she said.

Former Congressman George Miller administered the oaths of office to both the new and returning Supervisors, Burgis for Supervisor for District 3, which includes portions of Antioch, Andersen who was re-elected without opposition and Glover who began his fifth term as Supervisor for District 5 which includes the other portions of Antioch.

Diane Burgis in her new seat on the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors.

Diane Burgis in her new seat on the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors.

Burgis, a long time resident of the county, was welcomed to the board and paid homage to her alma mater, saying “Go Bulldogs” and then thanked her family for their support. She expressed her eagerness to start working with the board and introduced members of her staff, stating she is confident with their help and support they can “help Contra Costa meets its full potential.”

Burgis recognized her predecessor, Mary Piepho, thanking her for her encouragement, saying they share the same goals for Contra Costa County.

“In my district, I want to grow our economy while protecting our natural resources, including our precious Delta, provide quality public service, [and] protect the most vulnerable amongst us, while practicing fiscal responsibility and prudence,” Burgis stated.

In her outgoing remarks as Chair, Andersen thanked the board, staff and family for their support and hard work during her term.  She stated she is “grateful” to be re-elected and welcomes collaborating with Glover, in his new role as chair, and with Burgis, as well as the other supervisors.

“I am looking forward to working with my colleagues, both new and old as we continue to serve Contra Costa County,” she said.

Anderson hopes that the county’s past accomplishments can continue to produce new accomplishments for 2017. Focus will continue on the research and resources for mental health for county inmates.

“Next Saturday, Board and County Members will travel to Sacramento to attend the Stepping Up Summit, to look at Best Practices on this issue,” Andersen shared. “With the reopening of Pittsburg Fire Station 87, focus will continue on reopening station 16 in Lafayette. The County will continue to further their alliance with AMR and continue to work on faster medical emergency response times.”

Anderson was presented a gift of appreciation by Glover and the board and he thanked her for “making a solid voice for Contra Costa and for handling difficult decisions with style and grace.”

County Clerk Joe Canciamilla swore Glover as the new Board Chair and District 4 Supervisor Karen Mitchoff as the new Vice Chair of the Board for 2017.

The new Board of Supervisors for 2017 with Federal Glover as Chair. photo by Jonathan Bash

The new Board of Supervisors for 2017 with Federal Glover as Chair.

In his remarks, Glover announced “that this will be his last term, but it will be his best term.” He said he will continue to strive to make “one Contra Costa County,” and to maintain the county’s AAA bond rating from Standard and Poor’s. Focus will continue on developing employment opportunities.

He will continue to strive to make “one Contra Costa County,” and to maintain the county’s AAA bond rating from Standard and Poor’s. Focus will continue on developing employment opportunities.

Four years ago, Glover asked the Board to look into the revitalization of the northern waterfront in the county as a means of employment opportunities.  He will continue to pursue that but also as a means of goods movement.

“Revitalizing the waterfront will not only continue to bring us opportunity for job development but also open up an infrastructure that hasn’t been used in our waterway that will go good for goods movement that will allow us to continue roadwork that is so important,” he stated.

Glover hopes that this will eventually lead to other routes created within the state and other opportunities surrounding the Byron Airport. He then thanked the board, county and his family for their support during his term.

Glover reflected on his past health issues and thanked the county and board for their support during that time. He also thanked Miller and Canciamilla as inspirations and mentors in Glover’s political career.

Both Mitchoff and District 1 Supervisor John Gioia welcomed back their fellow board members, and Burgis, offering well wishes to each other for the New Year.  Both thanked their staff for their continued support.

Mitchoff recognized the new library opening this year in Pleasant Hill. Gioia reiterated the county’s success with the AMR alliance and faster medical response times. The Board joined together to sing Happy Birthday to Gioia and wished him well. Mitchoff stressed the importance of encouraging people to run for office.  Contra Costa County is one of the five counties, out of the 58 in the state, which have a female majority on their board.

“It is not a bad thing to put good people in office,” she stated.

During Public Comments, Marianna Moore, Director of the Ensuring Opportunity Campaign to End Poverty in Contra Costa thanked and congratulated members of the Board but also thanked Burgis for acknowledging her goal to protect the “most vulnerable amongst us.” Moore stressed the need to work together as the fear of the negative impact that will affect the county’s budgeting and programs, when the new federal administration takes over.  She stressed the need to create a sense of safety throughout the county and to continue to work as one Contra Costa County.

Debbie Toth, CEO of Rehabilitation Services of Northern California, which operates the Mt. Diablo Center for Adult Day Health Care, spoke after Moore and “echoed her sentiments” citing her major concern for the increase in senior homelessness, “that is the greatest number in poverty” and will continue to increase.

Pest Detection Specialist for Contra Costa County Department of Agriculture, Lindsay Skidmore of Lafayette, requested that when the labor contract between Local 1 and the County is reviewed, the A-2 medial plan not be removed.  Currently the new contract will not have this, leaving many without a subsidized health care plan, causing a negative impact on the income of many.

A motion was then passed to approve Glover’s nominations of Board Members to be appointed to various county committees and regional boards and commissions.

The meeting was adjourned in memory of former Danville Mayor Richard Waldo, and Richard “Brad” Nail, the former Director of Economic Development of Pittsburg.

Burgis in here new District Office in Brentwood, during a reception on Tuesday evening, January 10th. Photo by Allen Payton

Burgis in here new District Office in Brentwood, during a reception on Tuesday evening, January 10th. Photo by Allen Payton

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Shooting victim shows up at Antioch hospital Wednesday, won’t cooperate with police

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

By Sergeant Rick Smith, Antioch Police Community Policing Bureau

On Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at approximately 1:05 PM, Antioch Police Officers were advised of a possible shooting victim that had been brought into the Kaiser Hospital Deer Valley Emergency Room by car for treatment. Officers contacted an uncooperative male adult in the Emergency Room with a single gunshot wound.

Exact details of what occurred are still being investigated at this time and are vague. No further information will be released at this time.

This investigation is ongoing and anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to call the Antioch Police at (925) 778-2441. You may also text a tip to 274637 (CRIMES) using key word ANTIOCH.

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Antioch High running back, top national recruit Najee Harris picks Alabama over Michigan

Monday, January 9th, 2017
Najee Harris with his Antioch High School varsity football coach John Lucido before Saturday's U.S. Army All-American Bowl in San Antonio, Texas. source: John Lucido's Facebook page.

Najee Harris with his Antioch High School varsity football coach John Lucido before Saturday’s U.S. Army All-American Bowl in San Antonio, Texas. source: John Lucido’s Facebook page.

By Luke Johnson

The number one high school football recruit in the country, Najee Harris of Antioch High in Antioch, California is sticking with his commitment to the University of Alabama and will not decommit and attend the University of Michigan.

According to his trainer Marcus Malu, owner of Malu Fitness, Harris arrived on campus Sunday and will enroll Monday as spring semester classes begin Wednesday. Harris graduated from Antioch High School Dec. 22 — a semester earlier than most students in the Class of 2017 — to get a head start on practicing with his college team during spring ball.

Antioch High running back Najee Harris on his way to breaking the school record for rushing yards on Friday, September 4, 2015. file photo by Luns Louie

Antioch High running back Najee Harris on his way to breaking the school record for rushing yards on Friday, September 4, 2015. file photo by Luns Louie

He committed to Alabama as a sophomore in April 2015, but kept his recruitment status open and strongly considered Michigan. Many people thought Harris would change his decision based on the rapport developed with head coach Jim Harbaugh, who visited Antioch three times last year — most notably at Antioch’s Homecoming Game on Oct. 23, where he announced the Homecoming Queen winner.

However, Alabama Head Coach Nick Saban also made a visit to Antioch to meet with Harris in mid-December, which must have helped solidify five-star running back’s decision.

Harris rushed for the most career yards in Northern California history with 7,948 on top of scoring 99 touchdowns. But Harris has gone on record saying his proudest accomplishment was leading Antioch to its first league championship in 31 years in his junior year as the team finished the regular season undefeated (10-0).

He became the first Antioch student to participate in the U.S. Army All-American Bowl. He represented the West, whose offense struggled and only scored 10 points in a 27-17 defeat to the East in the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. After the game Saturday, Harris told reporters he was still undecided. However, he was seen arriving at Birmingham International Airport in Alabama the next morning.

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Tuesday’s Antioch Council agenda: city employee contracts, eliminating citywide administration costs from Measure C funds, charter city, more

Monday, January 9th, 2017

On the very full agenda for their meeting on Tuesday night, Jan. 10, the  Antioch City Council will vote on the Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) for the new contracts for each of the city employee groups, discuss the elimination of the Cost Allocation Plan (CAP) for citywide administration costs from Measure C funds and a possible pursuing becoming a charter city.

The MOU’s are the final step for the contracts the previous council unanimously approved Nov. 8, which last five years, beyond the end of Measure C, and provide a 4.5% pay raise an increase in benefits, at a total cost of $9.2 million to the city budget. As was stated in a previous Herald article, about 80% of the compensation increase will go to the police, including a 4.5% wage increase for sworn officers, and a 2.5% wage hike for non-sworn officers. Other union groups, including confidential employees, engineers and management, will receive annual pay hikes of 2-3% over the next five years.

The contracts are not final until the MOU’s are voted on. But, as stated by City Attorney Michael Vigilia in another previous Herald article on the contracts, “while it’s true that this is primarily a policy issue, there are also significant legal risks associated with a City Council potentially deciding to attempt to re-negotiate a tentative labor agreement that has already been approved by both a union and the City Council.”

City Manager Steve Duran made similar comments.

“The tentative agreements contain all business terms that were negotiated in good faith by the parties over many months,” Duran said. “They constitute, in writing, the business terms that the MOUs must contain, and have been ratified by the unions and approved by the City Council. Nickie and I have consulted with our professional labor negotiator and our City Attorney on this matter. Trying to change any of the business terms to which the parties have agreed is wrought with rather unpleasant legal and financial dangers to the City.

Vigilia and Duran were then asked if since the agreements are tentative and not finalized until the MOU’s are voted on, then how can there be legal ramifications if a new council majority wants to reopen negotiations and do something such as shorten the period?

Vigilia responded with, “To put it simply, the parties have reached a meeting of the minds as to the major terms of the MOU’s and each party has relied on the representations of the other party in deciding to agree to the terms. Once there is a meeting of the minds there is an enforceable legal obligation which would be very risky to break. The City, at the very least, risks breach of contract claims being asserted against it. Additionally, to attempt to renegotiate the terms exposes the City to potential charges of unfair conduct from the Public Employee Relations Board, which enforces collective bargaining laws covering public employees. This exposes the City to potential fines. As Steve and I stated, there are significant legal ramifications.”

Cost Allocation Plan

In one of the first moves to implement his agenda as Antioch’s new mayor, Sean Wright wants the council to eliminate the application of the city’s Cost Allocation Plan to Measure C funds, so that 100% of the sales tax revenue from the measure is used on what it was promised, more police and code enforcement. Following the CAP that’s been in place since 2005, staff has been allocating between 7.8% and 8.1% of the funds from Measure C that have been received by the police department to citywide administration.

That reallocation of Measure C funds out of the police department has become a bone of contention with some Measure C Oversight Committee members, including former member Sal Sbranti who has been outspoken on the issue, the public and some of the candidates during the most recent election.

Charter City

According to the League of California Cities, “Cities that have not adopted a charter are general law cities. General law cities are bound by the state’s general law, even with respect to municipal affairs.”

According to the staff report on the agenda item, “cities that adopt their own charter may adopt their own procedures, ordinances and resolutions for matters that are considered “municipal affairs” in the state of California. The report also includes a comparison of charter versus general law cities. City Charter is a written document that operates as the city’s “constitution” to the degree allowed under the California Constitution. A charter can only be adopted by a vote of the people of the City. Thus, a charter may be amended or repealed by subsequent votes of the people. An amendment may be proposed either by the city council or by initiative submitted to the council by the voters. Initiatives to adopt city charters may only be placed on the ballot during a general statewide election.”

So the soonest a charter city vote can take place is in November, 2018.

A charter city therefore has more control over its finances and governing than a general law city. If approved, becoming a charter city, by a vote of the people, would allow Antioch to have a full-time mayor, more council members and make it easier to raise taxes.

Only two cities in the county are charter cities, Richmond, which has seven council members and a full-time, paid mayor, and San Ramon, which has only five council members and no full-time, paid mayor. Of California’s 478 cities, 108 of them are charter cities.

The council meeting begins at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at Antioch City Hall, located at 200 H Street in downtown. They can be viewed via live stream on the city’s website or on Comcast’s local cable access Channel 24.

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Community invited to new County Supervisor Diane Burgis’ reception, open house, Tuesday evening

Monday, January 9th, 2017

burgis-reception-graphic

Burgis, Glover, Andersen to take oaths of office as Supervisors, Tuesday morning

Newly elected County Supervisor Diane Burgis will take her oath of office, along with re-elected Supervisors Federal Glover and Candace Andersen, at a ceremony during the regular meeting of the Board of Supervisors at 9:00 a.m. in Martinez, Tuesday, January 10, 2017.

Burgis will then hold a Community Reception and Open House later in the day.

“Thank you for electing me to represent you on the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors. I am incredibly honored to have this opportunity to fight for you and our local priorities,” Burgis said. “I hope you will be able to join me, my amazing staff and our neighbors in celebrating the new year at my first District 3 Community Reception and Open House this Tuesday, January 10, 2017 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

“I promise to have an inclusive and accessible office so that we can strengthen our community together. The first step is getting to know each other,” she added. “See you soon.”

The oath of office ceremony will be followed by a reorganization of the Board, with the election of the new Chair, which is expected to be Glover and Vice Chair, expected to be Supervisor Karen Mitchoff. The Board will then vote on Glover’s nominations of the board members to various county committees and regional boards.

DETAILS:

Oath of Office Ceremony

Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 9:00 am

Board Chambers, Room 107, Administration Building, 651 Pine Street, Martinez

Burgis Community Reception & Open House

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

4:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Office of Supervisor Diane Burgis, 3361 Walnut Blvd., Ste 140, Brentwood

RSVP appreciated at dist3@bos.cccounty.us.

District 3 includes most of Antioch, as well as Oakley, Brentwood, Discovery Bay, Bethel Island, Byron and Knightsen in East County, as well as Blackhawk and Camino Tassajara in the San Ramon Valley.

 

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