Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

By John Crowder

The Antioch City Council adopted a resolution approving a 60-day extension to the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the City of Antioch and Public Employees’ Union Local 1 (Local 1) and also appointed two new Planning Commissioners at their regular meetin on Tuesday, April 14, 2015. On budget matters, they approved agreements that will lead to improvements at Prewett Park’s Antioch Water Park, voted to provide some funding for the Fourth of July event, and agreed to become a participating member of the East Bay Regional Communications System Authority (EBRCSA).

Local 1 MOU

According to a staff report, the MOU between the City and Local 1 expired on March 31, 2015, and the City remains in negotiations with the union. At the suggestion of the Local 1 Business Agent, staff was recommending a 60-day extension to the current MOU, which would have no financial impact. As part of the consent calendar, the resolution was adopted on a 5-0 vote, with no discussion.

Two Commissioners Appointed

The City Council voted to appoint a new Planning Commissioner and a new Economic Development Commissioner. Each commissioner was appointed on a 5-0 vote.

Al Mason, a 10-year resident of Antioch, and currently retired, was appointed to the Planning Commission. Mason’s last position, according to his resume, was as Director, Business Development for WORKFLOWONE. In that position, he worked to establish long-term business contracts with Fortune 1000 companies. Prior to that position, Mason was Vice President, Sales, with REGULUS.

Joshua Young, an insurance agent with Diablo Valley Insurance, and who has lived in Antioch for 25 years, was appointed to a short-term vacancy (the term expiring in June, 2015) on the Economic Development Commission.

Water Park Improvements

The City Council, on two 5-0 votes, authorized the City Manager, Steve Duran, to execute agreements with RHAA Landscape Architecture to provide design services for improvements planned for Antioch Water Park, and with QPCS to provide a security camera system for the facility.

According to Lonnie Karste, President of Karste Consulting, and the consultant working with city staff on the water park project, improvements will include a splash pool, all-abilities playground, lighted sports court, and a group picnic area, in addition to the security camera installation. “We’re trying to get the major community service elements developed first,” said Karste.

During Council comments on the matter, Mayor Pro Tem Lori Ogorchock asked what progress was being made in seeking grants for the all-access playground. Karste responded that, while it has been investigated, grant funding availability is very limited, for a number of reasons.

Ogorchock also asked about the funding for the projects. Karste said that the funding is coming from the remaining $2 million available in Mello Roos funds, and that no additional funding beyond that is being considered.

Funding for July 4 Event

Wayne Harrison, Joy Motts, and Martha Parsons, with the Celebrate Antioch Foundation, asked that the City partner with them by providing funding, at a sponsor level, for the July 4th event.

According to a staff report, “The Antioch Police Department (APD) estimates its costs associated with this event will be approximately $20,475 based on previous experience. The Public Works Department estimates its costs for this event will be approximately $8,100.”

While the parade will continue to be held downtown, the remainder of the event has been moved to the county fairgrounds. Motts, in response to a question by Council Member Tony Tiscareno, listed several factors that make the fairgrounds a preferable venue for the event, including that the area is fenced, has restrooms available, and allows for private security to be effectively used.

We’re just trying to make sure that everybody stays safe, and that we have a great event for the community,”she said.

During Council discussion, Tiscareno questioned the difference between the cost for police services if the event were to be held downtown rather than at the fairgrounds. Antioch Police Chief Alan Cantando said that, on July 4th, officers will be brought in on overtime.

Based on estimates of the size of the event, Cantando said that, “When I hear that we’re the only show in town other than Oakley, that tells me that other people from other communities are going to be coming in to the City of Antioch for the fireworks and that’s definitely going to indicate that everyone that we have scheduled for overtime is going to have to be here.”

Duran also addressed the overtime cost, pointing out that the overtime for this, and other events typically supported by the city, is included in the budget when it is developed. “These are baked into the budget,” he said, “we don’t have to add anything.”

Mayor Wade Harper, after pointing out that the City is a partner in the 4th of July events, as costs for city services are absorbed by it, said that he would like Antioch to provide “at least $15,000” through the Arts and Cultural Foundation to help with other costs.

Council member Mary Rocha then made a motion to provide $15,000 from the General Fund in support of the 4th of July event. The money would be provided to the Arts & Cultural Foundation of Antioch, as fiscal agent, if the group is willing to serve as such. Otherwise, the money would go directly to Celebrate Antioch. The motion passed on a 5-0 vote.

EBRCSA

Cantando and Antioch Police Captain Tammany Brooks gave a presentation to the Council about the EBRCSA system. Cantando explained that, EBRCS, “is basically a digital radio system, that every agency in Alameda and Contra Costa County are on, with the exception of the City of Antioch and the City of Oakland.” “If we go to this system we will be able to communicate with all agencies in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, to include the fire department,” he continued. “It’s an officer safety issue, as well as a public safety issue,” he said. Cantando then provided the Council with examples of difficulties his department had experienced by not being on the system.

The cost for going to the EBRCS system, according to a staff report, is “approximately $1.83 million for the purchase and installation of system equipment, as well as a monthly recurring cost of approximately $8200 in user subscription fees to utilize these radios.”

During council comments, Tiscareno said, “We need to make sure that we provide a safe service for our police department and our residents, and if this is one method of doing so, I’m going to promote this.”

Ogorchock made the motion to adopt the resolution authorizing Antioch’s participation in EBRCSA, and it was seconded by Rocha. Following another statement in support of the resolution by Harper, the Council voted 5-0 in favor.

The next City Council meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 28, at 7:00 p.m. at which they will discuss the city’s response to the emergency drought restrictions. Meetings take place in the City Hall Council Chambers, located at 200 H Street or can be viewed on Comcast Channel 24 or via live stream video on the city’s website at www.ci.antioch.ca.us.

Share this:
email Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks su Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks digg Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks fb Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks twitter Antioch Council approves regional police communications system participation, water park improvements, $15,000 for July 4th fireworks

Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part-time attorneys as interim

Friday, April 24th, 2015

Includes former City Attorney Galstan

By Allen Payton

Lynn Tracy Nerland, Antioch’s City Attorney since January, 2006, is resigning her position, effective May 15, 2015 to take the same position with the City of San Pablo.

At the City Council’s next meeting on Tuesday, they will be asked to consider hiring Derek Cole as interim City Attorney and former Antioch City Attorney William Galstan, as the Assistant City Attorney, by contracting with Cota Cole LLP, their law firm, which specializes in municipal law, for up to $150,000.

Cole would be attending Council meetings and Galstan would be attending Antioch Planning Commission meetings, and working in city hall three days during the week.

According to the staff report for the agenda item, that amount is based on a $20,000 per month retainer for 105 hours per month, for an estimated six months, for a total of $120,000. Plus, another $30,000 would be budgeted for litigation or for an unanticipated large or complicated issue, charged at $185 per hour. The staff report further states “There will be salary cost savings during this period.”

Galstan served as Antioch City Attorney from 1979 to 2006. He and Cole currently serve as City Attorneys for Oakley. The City Attorney is one of only two employees the City Council hires, in addition to the City Manager.

The council meeting begins at 7:00 p.m., following a Special Study session on parts of the budget at 6:00 p.m. Meetings are held in the Council Chambers at 200 H Street in downtown Antioch or can be viewed on Comcast Channel 24 or online via live streaming video at www.ci.antioch.ca.us.

Share this:
email Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part time attorneys as interim su Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part time attorneys as interim digg Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part time attorneys as interim fb Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part time attorneys as interim twitter Antioch City Attorney Nerland resigning, Council to consider hiring two part time attorneys as interim

Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting

Friday, April 24th, 2015

By Allen Payton

In response to Governor Jerry Brown’s April 1st Executive Order and the Contra Costa Water District’s recent decision on water rationing due to the severe drought California is experiencing, the Antioch City Council will consider implementing new rules and setting a required public hearing for adoption, at its regular meeting, Tuesday night, April 28.

The governor has mandated “a reduction in usage by 25% across the state with reductions proportionate to relative per capita 2013 water usage,” according to the staff report for the agenda item.

The staff report also states, May 12 is the final date for the city and all other water agencies in the state, to have a drought program in place. At the public hearing, scheduled for that night, the council will consider adopting mandatory water conservation measures.

The city’s focus will be on outdoor irrigation, and staff is recommending adding two new items each, to the lists of prohibited activities for residential customers and non-residential customers in Antioch.

The staff report further states, “Violations of prohibited activities are punishable by fines of up to $500 for each day in which the violation occurs.”

To view the complete council meeting agenda, click here.

The council meeting begins at 7:00 p.m., following a special study session on parts of the budget at 6:00 p.m., in the Council Chambers at 200 H Street in downtown Antioch or viewed either on Comcast Channel 24 or via live streaming video on the city’s website at www.ci.antioch.ca.us.

Share this:
email Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting su Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting digg Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting fb Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting twitter Antioch Council to consider water rationing rules, set public hearing for May 12, at Tuesday meeting

Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Continued drought conditions prompt unprecedented action locally and statewide; affects Antioch; Board to consider temporary pricing adjustment, $500 fines

On April 15, the Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) Board of Directors unanimously approved an update to their existing drought program to now require 25 percent water use conservation and implement additional prohibitions deemed wasteful during drought times. This update responds to the Governor’s order announced on April 1 mandating a 25 percent reduction in water use statewide; this statewide mandate on water conservation is a first in California.

While California is experiencing serious continued drought conditions, local agencies are putting together updated programs to encourage conservation. The CCWD Board of Directors approved updates to their program requiring 25 percent conservation and implementing additional prohibitions on wasteful water use during a drought – such as limiting outdoor irrigation to no more than twice a week.

The CCWD restrictions do effect us as we are buying all of our water from CCWD for the rest of the year and, if no rain/snow until the water quality in the river allows us to pump again,” said City of Antioch Public Works Director/City Engineer Ron Bernal. “This year we anticipate purchasing 95% of our water from CCWD.”

When asked if that is the reason for the city’s proposed increase in water rates, Bernal responded, “That’s part of the reason. Buying water from CCWD at a cost of $10 [million per] year as opposed to pumping from the river creates a significant cost to the program.”

At a public hearing on June 3, the CCWD Board will consider a temporary pricing adjustment on the unit cost of water, a fine for violations of the prohibitions, and adjusting the baseline to 2013 water use -all in compliance with the state regulations. As proposed, the temporary pricing adjustment would only apply to households using over 200 gallons per day and would end once the emergency order is lifted.

According to the CCWD website, “Violators could be subject to fines of up to $500 and suspension of water service subject to board approval.”

Beyond local conservation programs, the state is taking action to implement projects intended to encourage conservation. The Save Our Water campaign is being broadcast statewide.

In an effort to protect water quality in the Delta for water users and fish, the state is moving forward with a rock barrier that would physically help deter sea water intrusion into the southern part of the Delta. Why should CCWD care about this barrier? It all comes down to water quality. CCWD’s water intakes are in the Delta, and salinity intrusion from the Bay is an issue for water quality. With drought conditions, less fresh water is available to flow through the Delta. While this temporary barrier could cause temporary inconveniences for those using those waterways, CCWD supports the decision to install the barrier as the water quality implications could have longer term impacts on Delta water users, fish, the environment, etc… The last time the state did this was during the 1977 drought.

All said, this drought is serious and agencies are implementing actions that are necessary to protect residents and the environment. Some are unprecedented, but so are the drought conditions statewide.

The Contra Costa Water District is governed by five elected Directors, each representing a division of approximately 110,000 people. The Board of Directors normally meet in regular sessions on the first and third Wednesdays of each month. Meetings begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Board Room at the Contra Costa Water District Office, 1331 Concord Ave. in Concord.

For more information visit www.ccwater.com/drought2015.asp.

Share this:
email Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions su Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions digg Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions fb Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions twitter Contra Costa Water District adopts 25% Drought Program consistent with state mandate, prohibitions

Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids’ Club preschool losing lease, relocating

Monday, April 20th, 2015

By John Crowder

Antioch residents shared their concerns about a lease between the Antioch Unified School District (AUSD) and Kids’ Club Preschool at the Wednesday, April 15, 2015, regular meeting of the Antioch School Board.

Ariana Sanchez was the first member of the public to address the board about Kids’ Club. In a moving statement, she credited the preschool with allowing her the opportunity to graduate from high school, since she was able to have her daughter in the program. “Kids’ Club holds a very special place for me,” she said. “Thanks to them, I am where I am today, and my daughter is, too.”

Other Antioch residents also came forward to speak about the preschool, with one parent presenting a stack of, “over 700 letters” in support of Kids’ Club. Calling the program, “one of the most successful preschools,” he asked the board, “Please, renew Kids’ Club’s lease.”

Mark Mokski, Executive Director of Kids’ Club Preschool, and the last member of the public to speak on the matter, first told the board about Kids’ Club being founded by an AUSD administrator and board members. He then stated he was not asking for a renewal of the lease, but help in raising “$100,000 to $200,000” to renovate one of a number of buildings he said he had, with the assistance of a real estate broker, which Mokski claims able to house the program, going forward.

The fate of the preschool has been the subject of some debate recently, both at public meetings, in a letter to the editor, and in an AUSD statement posted on their website. Kids’ Club is currently located at the former Bidwell Elementary School site, 800 Gary Avenue in Antioch.

In a letter written by Mokski and Sara Octaviano, Chairperson, Parent Advisory Committee for Kids’ Club Preschool, and posted on another news website on March 31, 2015, several statements are made which appear to make AUSD staff seem capricious and unconcerned about the preschool.

In the first paragraph, they state, “Kids’ Club Preschool…will be closing permanently in June 2015.” In the second paragraph they state, “The closure is due to the loss of the lease with Antioch Unified School District.” Later, they state, “AUSD is currently unwilling to renegotiate or continue with the lease.” Then, the letter states, “Why does a district with reduced enrollment need the space occupied by the preschool?” and “AUSD administration has not negotiated on the current space, nor have they presented viable options for alternative locations on district property.”

AUSD has a response posted on their website. The response states that, Kids’ Club, “has no relationship with the District other than leasing facilities from the District,” and “Kids’ Club is not a School District program and is not associated with the District.” It goes on to explain that, “As a result of the District’s growing need for special education, the District found it necessary to expand its current special education programs at Bidwell.” The statement then says that District personnel informed Kids’ Club that it did not intend to renew the lease in May, 2014, that they have attempted to assist Kids’ Club to identify alternative space, and that, although, “the District’s primary obligation is to provide an education to its students and plans to do so by utilizing the Bidwell property,” it has, and “is prepared to continue to assist Kids’ Club to find alternate space.”

Through a public records request, Antioch Herald staff obtained a copy of the lease agreement between AUSD and Kids’ Club, and a letter acknowledging the Bidwell facility would no longer be available for Kids’ Club at the end of this school year.

The Lease Agreement, dated August 1, 2012, allows Kids’ Club the use of the Bidwell facility for two years, the original lease expiring on July 31, 2014, but with a one-year option to renew. Further in the agreement, it states, “AUSD may terminate this Lease upon sixty (60) days’ written notice in the event that AUSD determines…the Premises are needed by AUSD for carrying out its primary mission of educating school children.”

The accompanying letter, sent from Kids’ Club to AUSD, signed by Mokski and dated May 22, 2014, states in part, “Kids’ Club Preschool acknowledges, based upon a verbal conversation on May 20, 2014 that the leased space will no longer be available after next year.”

The next Antioch School Board meeting will be held on May 13, 2015. Meetings are held at the AUSD School Services Building, located at 510 G Street, and begin at 7:00 p.m.

Share this:
email Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids Club preschool losing lease, relocating su Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids Club preschool losing lease, relocating digg Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids Club preschool losing lease, relocating fb Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids Club preschool losing lease, relocating twitter Antioch School Board hears concerns about Kids Club preschool losing lease, relocating

Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year

Sunday, April 19th, 2015

·Police to get another pay raise, 102 sworn officers budgeted

·General Fund subsidies to water park and golf course continue, Duran suggests privatization

·Harper declines assistant, at this time

·Ogorchock suggests selling marina, city owned land

By John Crowder

On Tuesday, April 14, 2015, the Antioch City Council held their first of three planned study sessions in preparation for the adoption of a two-year budget, covering fiscal years 2015-2016 and 2016-2017.

Dawn Merchant, Antioch’s Finance Director, presented the council with a review of the General Fund, Recreation and Animal Services Special Revenue Funds, and Prewett and Marina Enterprise funds. According to Merchant’s report, these other funds were included with a review of the General Fund because, “subsidies to these programs are integral to the General Fund budget.”

Merchant stated that the General Fund pays for police services, public works and community services, but also contributes to the subsidies.

In her slide presentation, Merchant outlined that the current fiscal year (2014-2015) is expected to end with a slight surplus of approximately $76,000, adding to the General Fund balance to bring the total amount of reserves to approximately $10.9 million. Then, going forward, the budgets show deficit spending of about $450,000 in fiscal year 2015-2016, and $1.5 million in 2016-2017, leaving the General Fund with a balance of $8.9 million at the end of the second year.

Merchant then compared the projected General Fund revenues and expenses with those in the pre-recession year of 2006-2007. She noted that actual revenues were $47 million and actual expenses $44 million, with just over $3 million added to reserves in the 2006-2007 fiscal year. For fiscal year 2015-2016, projected revenues are $48.6 million (more than the city received pre-recession, but, according to Merchant, only because of the addition of Measure C and Measure O revenue). Expenditures, however, are projected to be $49 million next year, $5 million more than the pre-recession number.

With respect to city staffing, Merchant said there were about 90 more positions with the city in 2006-2007.

Some of the revenue assumptions in the 2015-2016 budget are a 4% increase in property tax, a 3.5% increase in sales tax, and $2.3 million in Measure O revenue. One reduction in revenue that is being planned for in 2016-2017 is a loss of six months of Dispatch Reimbursement from the City of Brentwood, about $400,000. The Northeast Annexation is expected to generate an additional $450,000 revenue.

Expenditure assumptions in the 2015-2016 budget include several increases, including a 3% salary increase for the Antioch Police Officers Association (APOA) and Antioch Police Management Association (APSMA) members ($670,000), full-year furlough/salary restoration ($663,000), PERS contribution increases ($144,000), increased workers compensation premiums of 20% ($384,000), increased general liability premiums of 58% ($462,000), reinstatement of annual funding for vehicle replacement ($214,000), purchase of body cameras and tasers for police ($225,000), and the purchase of police vehicles ($450,000).

Subsidies from General Fund

Merchant then listed subsidies provided through the General Fund, including the golf course water subsidy of $118,000, the recreation and water park subsidies of $981,000, the animal services subsidy of $509,000, and the marina fund subsidy of $360,000. The latter subsidy would result if the city fails to prevail in an ongoing dispute with the state Department of Finance.

Police staffing at 102 sworn officers

Staffing assumptions included in the budget for both years include 102 police sworn staffing, the funding of one facility maintenance worker, reclassification of an incumbent employee to operations supervisor, eliminating one funded landscape maintenance lead worker, bringing funding to two operations supervisor positions, and then “all other staffing levels remain the same as in the current fiscal year.”

Staffing requests not included in the proposed budget included three community service officers ($275,000), one police records technician ($87,000), one additional code enforcement officer ($122,000, bringing the total number of code enforcement officers to four), two general laborers assigned to code enforcement ($174,000), one assistant development services-engineering technician in code enforcement ($80,000), one administrative assistant for HR/City Manager/Clerk ($85,000), one deputy city attorney ($193,000), one public works inspector ($140,000), one associate planner ($143,000), one irrigation technician (a split position of which approximately $50,000 would come from the general fund), and one part-time, temporary office assistant in the mayor’s office ($16,000).

Mayor’s assistant

Mayor Wade Harper, who had been asking for clarification of issues throughout the presentation, at this point addressed the mayor’s office assistant position.

I brought that up,” he said, “and I’m not asking for it to be funded at this time.”

He then said he was “in contact with Workforce Development to see if something like that could be funded through their Earn and Learn program.” He also said that volunteer interns might also be a way to fill the position.

I think it’s needed, I think we can do it on an intern basis. But that was my request,” Harper added.

Merchant then provided slides showing where, by department, money from the General Fund was going. She said that police (including the Animal Services subsidy) are projected in fiscal year 2015 to account for 74% of expenditures, public works for 14%, community development 7% and other departments combined to make up the remaining 5%.

Merchant discussed separately the impact to the General Fund of the Police Budget. In her report, she stated that, “the projected Police Department budgets for fiscal year 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 will significantly exceed the General Fund base plus Measure C projected revenues, thus pulling from other General Fund revenues, and reducing General fund reserves each fiscal year. Increases in the Police Department expenses are the major contributing factor to continual deficit spending in the General Fund projected budget, beginning next fiscal year.” The slide she provided at the meeting showed a difference in spending over budget of $1.6 million in fiscal year 2015-2016, and $5.1 million in fiscal year 2016-2017.

Merchant then provided slides showing General Fund projections further into the future, illustrating the impact of the projected deficit spending beginning next year, and culminating in a negative ending fund balance of $3.3 million in fiscal year 2019-2020, “in which case we’d be bankrupt at that point,” she said. This happens even though Measure C revenue would still be coming in at the time the city becomes bankrupt.

Unfunded liabilities

Finally, Merchant addressed the unfunded liabilities, saying in her report, “the City has a total unfunded pension liability of [approximately $78 million] for the safety and miscellaneous plans combined.”

Merchant’s report concludes the discussion of the General Fund budget with the statement, “The City cannot depend on savings to balance the budget and needs to carefully chart our course going forward to determine funding priorities. The City should only be spending within the level of revenues generated each year. We need to look for ways to achieve long term financial stability; otherwise the City will have to make dramatic cuts to services (including layoffs) in the future in order to remain solvent.”

The remainder of Merchant’s presentation was a reference to the various subsides provided out of General Fund revenues.

Following her presentation, Harper thanked Merchant for her presentation, then opened the meeting to public comments.

Three Antioch residents spoke at during the study session.

Janet Costa, Chair of the East County Regional Group, said that her group had conducted an assessment of all Antioch parks, and asked that funds be redirected to introducing more programs toward parks, especially those targeting the 0-5-year-old age group.

Antioch resident and real estate broker Mark Jordan said, “I have taken a look at the budget, and I guess that the best way that I can describe it is incredibly disappointing.”

We are on a path to financial ruin,” he continued, “and this game is just about over.”

Referencing the “unfunded retirement accounts,” Jordan asked, “The question at hand, is, where are you gonna get the money?”

Pointing toward City Hall, he said, “Because within a very few number of years, the building behind me will be empty. All the money will be going to pay for people who no longer work for the City.”

The solution is this. Convert the city to a charter city, and begin charging transfer fees on real property,” Jordan added.

He said charging such fees, at a rate of $13 per $1,000, would have raised about $81 million over approximately ten years, had the City been doing so.

Following public comments, Harper questioned City Manager Steve Duran after noting that Measure C “only lasts ten years.” He queried, “Are we looking at plans to increase revenues and decrease expenditures?”

Of course that’s what we want to do,” Duran responded.

He said staff would be recommending increases to the Master Fee Schedule. Duran then spoke about the importance of Measure O, and said that this summer he wanted to bring back a “menu of some strategic decisions…including what Mr. Jordan said.”

Duran then discussed the drain on General Fund revenue related to the water park and the golf course, and said one thing to consider was privatization. He said that, perhaps, animal services should be handed back to the county.

We have to look at our parks and [recreation] programs,” Duran added.

Council Member Monica Wilson said she was happy to hear some of the solutions that the City Manager referenced.

I’m glad that we’re looking at the animal shelter,” she said, and added that she was looking forward to seeing the fee schedule.

Mayor Pro Tem Lori Ogorchock said the city needed to look at selling the marina, along with some of the City’s vacant land.

Council Member Mary Rocha offered her thoughts.

These are heavy-duty issues, and the pressure from the community is going to be very large,” she stated. “Are we willing to take that hit? Because we have to stand together if we’re going to choose any one of these items to be put on for the chopping block.”

Council Member Tony Tiscareno asked Duran about real estate transfer taxes. Duran noted that the amount of money generated could be significantly higher than was currently received, but that, with respect to increasing the amount charged, “only charter cities can do that.”

Harper then asked Duran to bring more information about charter cities to the council.

As the meeting drew to a conclusion, Merchant related the schedule for future budget meetings, saying that the next budget session is scheduled for April 25th, another is on May 12, and May 26 is a “placeholder” for other items that might need to be brought back before the presentation of the entire budget on June 23.

Share this:
email Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year su Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year digg Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year fb Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year twitter Antioch Council deals with budget, revenues are up, but City faces deficits starting next year

Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday

Saturday, April 18th, 2015
Dylan Rath1 267x300 Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday

Dylan Rath

At about 9:43 AM Saturday, April 18, 2015, the Contra Costa County Office of the Sheriff Marine Patrol Unit was notified that the motorcycle rider missing since last Sunday was located by a family friend about a half-mile southeast of the Antioch bridge.

Marine Patrol units responded to the location and recovered a male body from the water.

The Coroner’s Division later took custody of the body and is confirming identity. An autopsy into the exact cause of death will also be performed.

At about 4:30 p.m., on Sunday, April 12, the motorcyclist, Dylan Rath, collided with a car and was tossed over the west side of the bridge and down into the river, below.

A search by authorities was begun that day, and was continued with the assistance of family members and friends, at the family’s request, until today.

Rath leaves behind his fiancee, their three month old daughter, for whom a GoFundMe account has been set up for financial support, his mother, and father, as well his brother, who was riding with him and a family friend, at the time of the accident. To donate to the GoFundMe account for Aria Rose Rath, please click here.

A tribute to Dylan will be held at Dos Rios Bar & Grill, 422 West Second Street in downtown Antioch, tonight, Saturday night, April 18 beginning at 9 p.m. However, his family members will not be attending.

No further information is being released at this time.

Share this:
email Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday su Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday digg Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday fb Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday twitter Missing body of motorcyclist in Sunday Antioch bridge accident, located Saturday

Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Who: Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) and Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)

What: A series of public open houses for Bay Area residents to learn about an update to the region’s long-range transportation and housing roadmap known as Plan Bay Area 2040. Participants will view displays and offer comments on long-term goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light-duty trucks, house the region’s projected population, improve public health, maintain the region’s transportation infrastructure and preserve open space, among others. Displays will also feature the schedule and key milestones for the plan update, offer information on how new housing and employment is forecast, and offer information on transportation improvements in the works at the county and regional level.

When & Where:

Contra Costa County: Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Walnut Creek Marriott, 2355 North Main Street, Walnut Creek

Alameda County: Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Alameda County Fairgrounds, Palm Pavilion, 4501 Pleasanton Avenue, Pleasanton (Wheels will run extended bus service on Route 53 between West Dublin/Pleasanton BART and the Fairgrounds.)

Check the plan website at www.planbayarea.org for updates.

Can’t Attend an Open House?

Join the online discussion at planbayarea.org or share your thoughts on Facebook or Twitter. Note that if you need an interpreter or other assistance in order to participate, we require three days’ notice in order to provide reasonable accommodation. For more information, call (510) 817-5757 or (510) 817-5769 for TDD/TTY.

Share this:
email Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan su Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan digg Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan fb Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan twitter Bay Area Open Houses scheduled for Plan Bay Area 2040 Regional Transportation and Housing Plan