Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee

Friday, January 30th, 2015

Washington, DC – Congressman Mark DeSaulnier (D, CA-11) announced that he will serve on the House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight & Government Reform’s subcommittee on Transportation and Public Assets.

During my time in the California legislature I fought to ensure greater transparency and accessibility. Whether leading the investigation into the construction of the Bay Bridge or passing the law that requires the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to develop the state’s transportation plans in a more strategic and open manner, oversight and accountability have always been a top priority. I hope to apply this experience, and what we have learned in California, on the federal level,” said DeSaulnier.

The transportation subcommittee has jurisdiction over the Departments of Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and the Transportation Security Agency. It also has purview over the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the General Services Administration and federal real property.

DeSaulnier will also serve on the subcommittee on Healthcare, Benefits, and Administrative Rules which has oversight jurisdiction over federal health care policy, the Department of Health and Human Services, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and government-wide rules and regulations. DeSaulnier will bring his previous oversight experience on these issues, most recently as a member of the California State Senate Committees on Human Services, and on Budget and Fiscal Review’s subcommittee on Health and Human Services.

Oversight of social and human services programs is critical to the health and well-being of our families and communities. We need to balance accountability of taxpayer dollars with quality and effective programs,” DeSaulnier added.

For more information visit http://oversight.house.gov/subcommittee/subcommittee-transportation-public-assets/

Share this:
email Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee su Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee digg Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee fb Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee twitter Congressman DeSaulnier to continue role of oversight on transportation on House subcommittee

New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Data Shed Light on Health, History of Region’s Transportation Network

OAKLAND, Calif., Jan. 28, 2015…The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) today unveiled its innovative Vital Signs website (vitalsigns.mtc.ca.gov), an interactive tool that Bay Area residents can use to track the region’s progress toward reaching key transportation, land use, environmental and economic policy goals. Residents also can consult the new website to learn more about historical trends, differences and similarities among the Bay Area’s many communities, and how the nine-county region stacks up with other major U.S. metro areas.

The first phase of the Vital Signs initiative examines 14 different indicators by which the health of the Bay Area’s transportation systems can be monitored. These include several measures of Bay Area transit agencies’ performance; a detailed look at pavement conditions on state highways, city streets and county roads; and a rank-ordered list of the 139 most congested freeway segments in the region. Phase II of the Vital Signs project, slated for completion this spring, involves land use and economic development measures. Data for Phase III, which will focus on environmental and safety questions, is due for release this summer.

Vital Signs is a wonderfully descriptive and appropriate name for this effort,” said MTC Chair and Orinda City Councilmember Amy Rein Worth. “In the same way that temperature, pulse and blood pressure can reveal a lot about a person’s overall health, measures such as transit cost-effectiveness, freeway delay, housing construction or neighborhood poverty rates can be used to gauge our region’s overall well-being.”

Dave Vautin, MTC’s Vital Signs project manager, says the website was designed to provide both access to data and a unique online experience. “This information is not just useful to researchers but genuinely interesting to the public at large. We’ve worked hard to develop customizable charts and maps, combined with high-quality graphics, that will allow all Bay Area residents to better understand what’s happening in their county, city and neighborhood.“

Among the key findings in the first set of Vital Signs data is that Bay Area commuters are committed to their choice of transportation. Solo drivers account for two-thirds of all commuters in the region, a statistic that has remained constant for decades. Still, among the nation’s 10 largest metro areas, the Bay Area has the third-lowest number of commuters who drive to work alone, trailing only New York and Washington, D.C. The percentage of Bay Area commuters who ride transit similarly has held steady at about 10 percent since the 1980s. The most significant shift in recent decades is the increasing number of residents who choose to bike to work or to telecommute. These gains have come at the expense of carpooling, which has declined in popularity over time. San Francisco leads all Bay Area cities with 32.6 percent of residents commuting to work by transit. Other cities in which the share of residents commuting via transit tops 20 percent include Albany, Colma, El Cerrito, Berkeley and Daly City.

While the Bay Area remains one of the nation’s most transit-oriented metro areas, and overall ridership in the region has grown in recent years, it is still well short of the modern-era peak achieved in 2001. Total transit ridership dipped 3 percent from 2002 to 2012 (the latest year for which National Transit Database information was available for Phase 1 of the Vital Signs project) and per-capita ridership declined 10 percent over this time. New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and Miami all experienced notable growth in both overall and per-capita transit ridership from 2002 to 2012. The only major metro areas with greater declines in ridership than the Bay Area are Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth and Atlanta. Indeed, considering the growth of the Bay Area population, the region has for two decades become less dependent on public transit, with the average resident boarding a bus, train, ferry, light-rail vehicle or cable car 79 times in 1991, compared to just such 68 trips in 2012.

Several major Bay Area transit operators carried fewer riders on a typical weekday in 2012 than they did in 1991, with declines ranging from 7 percent for San Francisco Muni to 30 percent for SamTrans. Ridership slipped 13 percent at the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) and 17 percent at AC Transit. In contrast, BART and Caltrain ridership has climbed to record highs, with Caltrain carrying over 140 percent more riders each weekday than it did in 1991 and BART’s weekday ridership rising nearly 50 percent over this period.

The complete list of transportation performance measures now available on the Vital Signs website includes:

  • Commute Mode Choice (by residential and employment location)

  • Commute Time (by residential and employment location)

  • Commute Patterns

  • Traffic Volumes at Regional Gateways

  • Time Spent in Congestion

  • Miles Traveled in Congestion

  • Travel Time Reliability

  • Transit Ridership

  • Transit System Efficiency

  • Daily Miles Traveled

  • Street Pavement Condition

  • Highway Pavement Condition

  • Bridge Condition

  • Transit Asset Condition

MTC is the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

NOTE: The Vital Signs initiative is further illuminated by several short videos posted on MTC’s website at: http://mtc.ca.gov/news/press_releases/vitalsigns_launch.htm.

Share this:
email New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs su New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs digg New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs fb New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs twitter New website lets residents monitor Bay Area’s Vital Signs

Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015
Go Giants 1024x729 Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch

Richard Pagano, right, owner of a State Farm Insurance agency in Antioch, and his office staff Yolanda Larios, Elisa Tavera, Serena Xavier, enjoy viewing the Giants’ three World Series trophies, during their tour stop in Antioch, on Tuesday, January 27. Richard, with his best “fear the beard” smile, is unfortunately a Dodgers fan. His staff has it right.

By Allen Payton

The San Francisco Giants baseball team’s three World Series trophies from their championships in 2010, 2012 and 2014 were in Antioch on Tuesday, January 27, as part of a tour to Northern California cities.

Antioch was included because it has a Junior Giants program. Hundreds of residents lined up to take photos with the trophies, which were on display at the Antioch Community Center at Prewett Park.

The tour lasts through April 13. For more information click here.

Share this:
email Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch su Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch digg Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch fb Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch twitter Giants World Series trophies visit Antioch

Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

By John Crowder

The January 27, 2015 meeting of the Antioch City Council included a report by Chief of Police Allan Cantando detailing crime statistics for the year 2014, and a handful of residents speaking out about a proposal to create a downtown event center.

According to Cantando, the city experienced a reduced level of criminal activity in 2014 as compared to the previous year. Total reportable violent crime was down 9.7%, and total property crime was down 5.6%. Only one category of crime, rape, saw an increase. However, as Cantando explained, this increase was not due to an upsurge in the crime, but rather was a result of a new FBI definition as to what acts constitute the crime.

A highlight of the crime report was the amount of volunteer work being done. Antioch Police Department (APD) volunteers worked over 10,000 hours in 2014. Volunteers worked primarily in field services (over 8,000 hours) and records (over 1,500 hours), but also contributed time to investigations and work in professional standards. Cantando said the value of the work done by volunteers was estimated at approximately $235,000.

Discussing an area that has been somewhat contentious at council meetings over the last year, especially when it involved feral cats, Cantando said that Animal Control had received almost 2800 calls for service in 2014.

Cantando also noted that calls for service were relatively flat over the last year, with APD receiving 80,407calls in 2014, as compared to 79,939 in 2013. Response times also remained relatively flat, with response times for Priority One calls in 2014 averaging 10 minutes, 36 seconds compared to 10 minutes, 30 seconds in 2013.

With respect to the number of police officers employed by the city, Cantando said that there were currently 90 full-time positions filled, and that three recruits began the Academy on January 26, 2015. The full report can be viewed as part of the City Council Meeting Agenda, by clicking here. Annual year-to-year Antioch crime statistics and maps can be viewed by clicking here.

Downtown event center backers speak

Not on the agenda, but addressed by four members of the public, was an idea put forward repeatedly at council meetings over the past few months by a group of residents who want to create an event center by combining the downtown Senior Community Center with development of the approximately two-acre lot, known as the old Beede lumber yard property.

Joy Motts, a leader in the effort, read a letter to the council written by her brother, Kerry Motts, Vice Chair of Antioch’s Planning Commission. In the letter, Motts spoke of the historical significance of the Beede site, saying it was, “indispensable as the one site that incorporates all of Antioch’s finest assets,” referencing the views it affords of the Delta, and proximity to the water, downtown shops, and founding location of the city. Motts painted a vivid word picture of their vision for the project, calling it a great idea that meaningfully reflects, “the history and traditions of our town.” The letter concluded by saying that the idea has, “the power to bind people together and bring unity under a goal and a vision that is stronger and more lasting than any short-term gain from selling our citizens’ best asset.”

Lee Ballesteros, who, along with her husband, John, founded and operate the nonprofit Drama Factory in Antioch, also spoke in favor of the event center proposal. Ballesteros quoted mayors of two other cities recognizing the importance of open, recreational space to a community. She said that research shows that high-quality parks, “spur economic development by attracting home buyers and boosting residential property values.” Ballesteros also argued that the proposal for an event center, “written by the people and for the people,” would serve as a “green engine” to “help address nearly every critical urban need from health to housing, to education and environmental justice” and that it would also help to counter sprawl and combat crime.

Wayne Harrison, a 15-year resident of Antioch, and President of the Celebrate Antioch Foundation, also spoke in support of the event center proposal.

These citizens deserve a chance,” he said.

Alluding to complaints that their proposal has been largely ignored by city staff, he said, “I urge you to give this group the respect that they deserve.”

Event center supporters had an artist rendering of the proposed project available for members of the public to view.

The next regular city council meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, February 10. Meetings are held in the City Council Chambers, located at 200 H Street, next to City Hall, on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month, beginning at 7:00 p.m. They can be viewed live on Comcast Channel 24 or on the city’s website via live streaming, at www.ci.antioch.ca.us/CityGov/citycouncilmeetings.htm. They are also archived, there, as well.

Share this:
email Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014 su Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014 digg Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014 fb Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014 twitter Antioch Council hears good news from Chief Cantando: crime down in Antioch in 2014

Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County

Monday, January 26th, 2015

ConnstanceHoldaway Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County

New CCWD Director Connstance Holdaway

On December 17, 2014, the Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) Board of Directors unanimously approved Connstance Holdaway to fill the Board vacancy left by the passing of Director Karl Wandry.  Holdaway participated in her first Board meeting representing Division 5 on January 7, 2015.  The Division 5 seat will be up for election in November 2016.

Holdaway lives with her family in Oakley and currently works as a paralegal in Oakland. She will represent residents in most of Antioch and Oakley, and parts of Brentwood. (see Division 5 map, CCWD Division5 map)

CCWD received applications from eleven candidates, and from those, selected six individuals for interviews conducted at the December 10 meeting. Seven Antioch residents applied, including Richard Hobin and Josuwa Bernardo, who made the final round, as well as Dennis Gonden, Angel Luevano, Lamar Thorpe, Julian Isham and Mark Foley. At their December 17 meeting, the Board appointed Holdaway to represent Division 5.

Board members agreed that Connstance will uphold the Board’s commitment to represent the needs of our customers and provide high-quality water service,” said CCWD Board resident, Joseph L. Campbell.

Holdaway is a 2008 graduate of Cal State Hayward (now East Bay) in Criminal Justice Administration, and received a certificate in Paralegal Studies from JFK University in 2011. She is a former Manager for Safeway in Clayton and has been a Team Parent since 2012 for the Delta Youth Baseball & Softball League.

All applications and documents related to the selection process were made available for public review on the website and at the District offices.

For more information visit www.ccwater.com.

Share this:
email Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County su Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County digg Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County fb Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County twitter Water Board appoints new member to represent Antioch, East County

Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at-large

Monday, January 26th, 2015

OAKLAND, Calif., – The Metropolitan Transportation Commission – the Bay Area’s transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency – is recruiting interested Bay Area residents to fill three vacancies on its Policy Advisory Council. In Contra Costa County, there is an opening for an individual representing disabled interests. In Santa Clara County, the vacancy is for an individual to represent either the economy or the environment. And the third vacancy is an at-large seat, to be filled by an individual representing either the economy or the environment from any of the nine Bay Area counties. The Council meets the second Wednesday of the month from 1:30-3:30 p.m. in Oakland, and advisors are reimbursed for their transportation to and from the meeting.

Created by the Commission in November 2009 to advise MTC on transportation policies in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Policy Advisory Council incorporates diverse perspectives relating to the environment, the economy and social equity. The Council advises MTC on a range of dynamic topics, including:

  • Regional planning efforts linking transportation, housing and land-use plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Public transit service productivity improvements to produce more efficiency from the region’s existing transit investments.

  • Pursuit of new revenues to support a transportation system that better serves all Bay Area residents.

    The Commission wants and needs to hear various viewpoints when making transportation policy and investment decisions,” said MTC Chair Amy Rein Worth. “Incorporating different perspectives enhances our decision-making process. The Policy Advisory Council helps the Commission to improve mobility for all Bay Area residents.”

Applications for the three vacancies will be accepted through February 9, 2015. No specific educational background is needed for most seats – just a background in the specific application category, and an interest in transportation and how it affects residents in the nine Bay Area counties. Experience working on public policy issues or community-related issues is desirable. Appointed advisors are expected to attend monthly meetings at MTC’s offices in Oakland and will serve through the term ending in July 2017. While positions are voluntary, advisors do receive a small stipend for their attendance at certain meetings.

MTC’s appointing Commissioners will review the applications, and the full Commission is scheduled to approve the selections in March. The selected applicants will attend their first meeting on April 8, 2015. To apply for a vacant position or to learn more about the Policy Advisory Council, visit www.mtc.ca.gov/get_involved/advisory or call (510) 817-5757.

Share this:
email Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at large su Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at large digg Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at large fb Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at large twitter Transportation Commission seeks to fill vacancies on Advisory Council, one from Contra Costa, one at large

Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions

Saturday, January 24th, 2015

By Allen Payton

In spite of polls showing an overwhelming number of Americans oppose taxpayer funding of abortion, both Congressmen representing Antioch voted against a new ban on the practice on Thursday, January 22. The vote occurred on the 42nd anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe vs. Wade decision legalizing abortion.

Until the passage of Obamacare in 2009, the federal government had not allowed the funding of abortions using federal funds, with exceptions for rape, incest and life endangerment of the mother, since the passage of the Hyde Amendment in 1976. That is passed every year as part of a spending bill. But, this bill would make that law permanent. It also ensures that Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, faithfully conforms with the Hyde Amendment as promised by the President.

In one of his first votes as a new Member of Congress, Mark DeSaulnier (D, CA-11), along with Jerry McNerney (D, CA-9), serving in his fifth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, voted with the other 176 of the 188 Democrats in the House, plus one Republican, to oppose the bill. It passed mainly along party lines with 239 Republicans and three Democrats voting in favor, and five Republicans and seven Democrats not voting. It’s the third time the House has passed a bill with the same language.

If passed by the Senate and signed by President Obama, who has threatened a veto, the bill, HR-7, entitled “No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion and Abortion Insurance Full Disclosure Act of 2015,” will end the four year practice using federal tax dollars for abortions, with exceptions for rape, incest or when the mother’s life is endangered.

The text of the bill reads in “Sec. 301. Prohibition on funding for abortions, “No funds authorized or appropriated by Federal law, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are authorized or appropriated by Federal law, shall be expended for any abortion. In Sec. 302, the bill includes a “Prohibition on funding for health benefits plans that cover abortion – None of the funds authorized or appropriated by Federal law, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are authorized or appropriated by Federal law, shall be expended for health benefits coverage that includes coverage of abortion.”

However, Section 308 read “Treatment of abortions related to rape, incest, or preserving the life of the mother, The limitations established in sections 301, 302, and 303 shall not apply to an abortion– (1) if the pregnancy is the result of an act of rape or incest; or (2) in the case where a woman suffers from a physical disorder, physical injury, or physical illness that would, as certified by a physician, place the woman in danger of death unless an abortion is performed, including a life-endangering physical condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself.”

According to the bill’s author, Rep. Chris Smith (R, NJ-4) “On September 9, 2009 President Obama stood 6 feet from where I stand now and told lawmakers and the American public in a specially called joint session of Congress on healthcare reform that ‘under our plan, no federal dollars will be used to fund abortion.’

Turns out that those ironclad promises made by the President himself are absolutely untrue,” Smith stated. “An extensive audit by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released in September of last year found that 1,036 Obamacare exchange plans covered elective abortion. GAO also found that separate billing of the abortion surcharge – required by the Act – is not being enforced by the administration and the abortion-funding premium is again being illegally rolled into the total plan cost.”

Health care consumers are therefore buying health insurance with little or no knowledge that they are purchasing abortion subsidizing plans,” Smith added.

Based on numbers reported by the Guttmacher Institute from 1973-2011, with projections of 1,058,490 for 2012-14, almost 57.5 million abortions have been performed in the U.S. since the Roe vs. Wade decision. The Guttmacher Institute estimates a possible 3 percent under reporting rate, which is factored into the overall total.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, in the most recent year reported on their website, “Among the 28 areas that reported cross-classified race/ethnicity data for 2010…, non-Hispanic white women and non-Hispanic black women accounted for the largest percentages of abortions (36.8% and 35.7%, respectively), whereas Hispanic women and non-Hispanic women in the other races category accounted for smaller percentages (21.0% and 6.5%, respectively). Non-Hispanic white women had the lowest abortion rates (8.6 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44 years) and ratios (141 abortions per 1,000 live births), whereas non-Hispanic black women had the highest abortion rates (31.8 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44 years) and ratios (483 abortions per 1,000 live births).”

For more information and the complete text of the bill on the Clerk of the House’s website, click here.

Share this:
email Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions su Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions digg Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions fb Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions twitter Reps. McNerney, DeSaulnier vote against bill to ban taxpayer funded abortions

Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed-use project

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

By John Crowder

Over the last few months, Antioch residents supporting a proposal to convert the old Beede lumber yard property bordered by Second, Third and E Streets, a roughly two-acre parcel that has been vacant for years, into a permanent outdoor event center, have been speaking out at city council meetings, asking for a hearing on their proposal. The January 13 meeting of the Antioch City Council was no exception, as Joy Motts, one of the leaders in the effort, once again pleaded their case to council members.

In her statement, Motts lamented the lack of response from city staff to their repeated requests for a discussion of the idea. She began by outlining the now two-year history of requests for consideration put forward by her and other community members.

Over two years ago Sean Wright, Kerry Motts, myself and a few Rivertown developers came together to discuss plans for an event center for downtown Antioch on the vacant Beede lumber site property at the corner of 2nd and E Street,” she said. She went on to say that her group had been asked to postpone moving forward by the former city manager, Jim Jakel, in order that the “full attention of the council” could be given to the passage of Measure C during the November, 2013 election, and that they had agreed to do so.

Motts related that in early 2014, her group had been excited to meet with the new city manager, Steve Duran, but were disheartened to learn that, “Mr. Duran has had no interest in our proposal, or in listening to the community as to their wishes for downtown and went forward with a plan for multi-unit properties on the site we believe is the natural, and most economical, place to create a downtown community event center…just like every community around us has or is in the process of creating.”

She went on to say that the plan Duran had conceived was only slowed through, “numerous citizens’ requests.”

Motts said that, the past seven months had seen, “dozens of speakers at council meetings, over 1,000 signatures…asking for this topic to be [placed on the city council agenda] for discussion, and yet here we are, January 2015, and we have received absolutely no response from you or your staff.” Motts concluded by listing several of the groups in support of the event center proposal, including Rivertown residents, the Rivertown Preservation Society, and the Celebrate Antioch Foundation.

Following the meeting, Motts stated, “The community and Rivertown residents deserve a chance to discuss with the City the economic vitality and permanent legacy an event center would bring to Rivertown in contrast to the multi-unit development that is currently proposed.”

When Duran was asked about the delay in bringing the idea before the city council, he provided the following comments via email to Herald staff:

The City Council approved a Request for Qualifications and Proposals (RFQ/P) process that is looking for residential development on that site based on extensive studies over the years and on my recommendation. Staff is currently carrying out that process, and has advised all along that it would take months before we would come back to the City Council with recommendations, as noted in my Monthly Report (See the City web site). Staff is in discussions with a number of qualified developers and will be for several more weeks.

The Beede site is zoned for residential development and has been since at least as far back as the last General Plan update in 2003. General Plans, of course, go through an extensive public process, including Environmental Impact Reports, and are approved by the Planning Commission and City Council. In addition, there have been a number of studies done by the City over the years, the most recent and promising of which is the 2006 ‘Arcadis’ plan, called ‘Antioch Rivertown Waterfront Development.’ Like all the preceding plans, the Beede site was designated to be predominantly residential.

The ideas that Ms. Motts has brought forth have been listened to and heard over the years and I have certainly done the same. Staff has reviewed the proposal her group presented and, when we have finished considering all the ideas and proposals we are exploring, staff will be making a complete report with our recommendations to the City Council.

It’s the staff’s job to analyze and make recommendations to the Council, aided as necessary with additional professional expertise. It would not be fair for any contender for the development of that site, or any City-owned site, to end run the process the City Council directed or to have the City Council consider one idea in isolation with no input from myself, our staff or our consultants that have extensive experience in real estate, redevelopment and downtown revitalization. All ideas and/or proposals, and the developers, need to be scrutinized by staff and consultants so that the Council can make a well informed decision.”

Duran also provided the following links for reference:

General Plan:

http://ci.antioch.ca.us/CityGov/CommDev/PlanningDivision/docs/Antioch_Adopted_General_Plan.pdf

Arcadis study:

http://ci.antioch.ca.us/CityGov/Finance/EconDev/Rivertown-Waterfront-Development.htm

Share this:
email Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed use project su Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed use project digg Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed use project fb Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed use project twitter Antioch group proposes downtown event center instead of mixed use project