Archive for May, 2016

Back-to-back finals for Golden State

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016
Steph Curry answers questions at the press conference following Game 7 of the Western Conference finals, on Monday, May 30, 2016. photo by F.D. Purcell

The Warriors’ Steph Curry answers questions at the press conference following Game 7 of the Western Conference finals, on Monday, May 30, 2016. photos by F.D. Purcell

Warriors win three in a row beating Thunder 96-88 to head to their second straight NBA Finals

The 2016 Western Conference Championship Trophy was presented to the Warriors following Monday night's victory.

The 2016 Western Conference Championship trophy was presented to the Warriors following Monday night’s victory.

By F.D. Purcell, Herald Bay Area Sports Reporter

When two-time MVP Stephen Curry did his usual pregame ball toss and pop with courtside security guard Curtis Jones on Monday his eyes were dark and dim, but there was something about his aura. He was laser focused. Curtis inbounded the ball, Curry missed the first shot, the crowd gasped. After he missed his next three, he held up one finger, head bobbing to the music…splash.

What a precursor to the game he’d have scoring 36 points in his team’s 96-88 victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder 4-3 in the best of seven.

“No one ever had any doubt we could get this done,” said Draymond Green following the game.

Fans paid as much as $29,000 for courtside seats for this game after the Warriors won Game 6 in Oklahoma. The Oracle fans stayed afterwards as the team received their Western Conference Championship trophy midcourt.

“We were a mature basketball team that tried our best not to listen to the noise outside,” said Curry. “Let’s figure this out let’s go out and take it one game at a time and crawl our way back into the series and see what happens.”

They crawled and clawed back, winning three in a row, silencing all who said they couldn’t do it.

Now they’ll face the Cavaliers for the second straight year. The Warriors swept them in the regular season. King James will certainly be looking for redemption.

The Warriors host Cleveland in Game 1 of the NBA Finals Thursday, June 2nd. Tip-off is at 6:00 p.m.

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Most candidates at District 3 Supervisors forum support fire tax hike, one opposed

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

By Dave Roberts

One of the biggest problems facing East County residents is the lack of adequate fire protection and emergency services. Most of the candidates for county supervisor representing District 3, which includes East County, favor raising taxes to beef up staffing in the East Contra Costa Fire Protection District (ECCFPD). Only one candidate, Doug Hardcastle, has publicly opposed a fire tax hike.

ECCFPD voters have twice rejected fire tax hike measures in recent years. In 2012 a 10-year parcel tax hike, which required two-thirds approval to pass, failed to gain even a majority. In 2015 a benefit assessment, which needed a majority to pass, also failed with 53 percent of voters rejecting it. The district may place another tax hike measure on the November ballot.

In 2008 the fire district was able to staff six fire stations with 48 employees on a $10.8 million budget. But the current $12.1 million budget – a 12 percent increase in funding – only provides for 36 employees and staffing for three fire stations. This has resulted in longer response times, particularly in outlying areas, putting East County residents’ lives and property at risk.

The reason that a 12 percent budget increase in the past eight years has resulted in layoffs and station closures is that employee salary and benefit costs have risen even faster, 15 percent. Most significantly, retirement expenses have increased 64 percent from $2.2 million in 2008 to $3.6 million today.

Four of the six candidates seeking to replace Mary Piepho on the county board of supervisors – Steve Barr, Diane Burgis, Hardcastle and Odessa Lefrancois – discussed the fire district problem at a recent forum in Discovery Bay. The other two candidates – Wade Harper and Monica Wilson – failed to show due to family emergencies, according to Greg Robinson, publisher of the Brentwood Press, which sponsored the forum.

The candidates responded to this question: “Fire protection in East County is an ongoing concern. Despite the fact that there are three stations open with a fourth scheduled to open in July, the voters still turned down a recent tax initiative to support and reopen stations. What do you see as the solution to the ongoing funding for the district, and how can the supervisors help?”

Brentwood City Councilman Barr is the only candidate who has sat on the ECCFPD board, where he’s now in his fourth year.

“I know firsthand what the issues are out here,” he said. “The simple fact is there is not enough funding to fund more than three fire stations. It’s about $2.8 million per station, and the current funding from your property taxes is somewhere around $10 or $11 million. So as you can see, you’re not going to get anything more than three stations.”

The fire board has conducted a study, which determined that the 250-square-mile district actually needs nine fire stations to provide adequate protection, said Barr. He did not do the math at the forum, but nine stations at $2.8 million per station would total $25 million, more than double the district’s current budget.

“So I think we’re on the right track,” he said, adding that he’s “hopeful” about the next tax measure.

Barr did not mention Piepho by name, but he criticized the lack of leadership provided by the county supervisor on the issue.

“The supervisor of this county needs to step up and be the one leading, not the city manager of the city of Brentwood [who is chairing a task force],” he said. “I’m happy he’s doing it because he’s actually looking for solutions, like we all have. And I think that’s exactly what I would expect out of the county supervisors. Not leave it all to one of the cities, but actually leading and showing leadership and finding solutions.”

Oakley City Councilman Hardcastle said the solution is not another tax hike attempt.

“We’ve had enough studies,” he said. “People do not want to raise their taxes again. They tried it twice already. It’s ridiculous that they would even try it twice. We pay too much money. We just need to learn how to spend our money properly where it needs to be spent. I’m there to make sure that that money gets spent like that.”

“I’ve been in business for 40-something years,” Hardcastle continued. “You don’t stay in business for 40-something years by spending money needlessly on stuff that it doesn’t need to be spent on. So my number one priority is going to be conservancy of the money to make sure that our dollars are spent like we want them to spend it.”

Hardcastle did not provide specifics on how he would like to reallocate the fire district’s budget, but said something needs to be done, including increasing salaries.

“Our fire stations out here are in horrible shape,” he said. “These guys are overworked; a lot of them are underpaid. I talked to one guy, he’s [making] $20 an hour being a fireman. That is ridiculous.”

One possibility is continuing the temporary funding provided to the fire district by the county and the cities of Brentwood and Oakley that has allowed the Knightsen station to be reopened through June 2017.

“My number one priority in this whole thing is having our families be safe,” said Hardcastle.  “We can get money from our budgets at the city.”

Lefrancois, who is a past president of the East County NAACP, also favors other government agencies pitching in to help the fire district.

“As a supervisor I’d like to bring all of the concerned parties to the table to try to figure this out,” she said. “This needs to be figured out not just by the county board of supervisor[s], but also by the county board of education and also special district[s] who also have funding on safety that goes into their budget[s].”

Lefrancois also agrees with Barr that another tax hike attempt should be studied. “Maybe we need to figure out from the voters what type of tax, if there is a parcel tax, what would they be willing to pay, what would they be willing to do,” she said. “I think this is a very complex issue, and it needs more than just one individual at the table making that decision.”

East Bay Regional Park District board member Burgis also wants to look at the possibility of another tax hike measure. “We need to find more revenue,” she said. “That can be different tools. That can be property tax, it can be reallocation, it can be consolidation. It can be a whole combination of things. But it has to be legal. And it has to be something that we make urgent.”

She did not mention Barr by name, but criticized the fire board’s efforts thus far.

“The problem has been the leadership on this fire board hasn’t done the job,” said Burgis. “So we need to figure out what hasn’t worked and stop that and move forward. We need to have a more accountable fire protection board. I think that having an elected board that is responsible for the district is a good step.”

Burgis agreed with Barr that there needs to be county leadership on the issue.

“As a supervisor we are one part of three parts: Oakley, Brentwood and the county,” she said. “And as supervisor I would be that leader. I would bring those people together. That’s the reputation I have is bringing people together that have different opinions, politics and agendas and making sure that we do what we need to do. … It’s a problem that we need to deal with.”

On other issues, the candidates mostly agreed that:

  • The proposed Delta tunnels project should be opposed because it would degrade water quality.
  • Development of the Byron Airport could be an economic boon to East County.
  • There is a need to attract more businesses to East County to provide local jobs.
  • Local farmland needs to be protected.
  • Crime, including shootings on Highway 4, needs to be reduced.

The election is June 7th. If no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote, then the top two will face off in the general election in November.

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Residents gather to remember during annual Antioch Memorial Day ceremonies, Monday

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016
Major General Dan Helix of the U.S Volunteers Honor Guard speaks at the annual Antioch Memorial Day ceremonies on Monday, May 30, 2016.

Major General Dan Helix of the U.S Volunteers Honor Guard speaks about the sacrifices made by military men and women throughout American history, at the annual Antioch Memorial Day ceremonies on Monday, May 30, 2016.

Raising of the flags to half mast.

Raising of the flags to half mast.

By Allen Payton

Hundreds of Antioch and East County residents gathered at the Oak View Memorial Park, Monday morning, to honor those military men and women who had sacrificed their lives for our freedoms, during the annual Memorial Day commemoration.

The morning’s event began with a motorcycle procession from Antioch City Hall, led by the Knights Palladin.

Local veteran J.R. Wilson served as Master of Ceremonies, and Pastor Chris Williams of the Church at Antioch offered the opening and closing prayers.

The American Legion presented the colors, and the American and POW/MIA flags were raised, then lowered to half staff.

Casey Ferrier of Boy Scout Troop 450 and a friend led in the Pledge of Allegiance, followed by a rousing rendition of the National Anthem by Velma Wilson, to which the audience sang along.

Major General Dan Helix, of the U.S. Volunteers Honor Guard, was the guest speaker, offering an overview of the sacrifices made in the various wars, throughout American history.

Placing of the Roses at 9-11 Memorial

Placing of the Roses at 9-11 Memorial

That was followed by a performance by the Deer Valley High Marching Band, offering portions of the songs from each of the various military branches. As each song was played, the veterans of that branch stood and received a warm round of applause.

Velma Wilson then led in the singing of God Bless America, followed by the sounding of Two Bells and the Placement of the Roses on the 9-11 Memorial by representatives of the Antioch Police and Contra Costa Fire Departments.

Mayor Wade Harper and Henri Vellieux, Commander of the Antioch VFW Post then placed a wreath at the memorial to all those from Antioch who had died in wars.

Jean Espinosa of Boy Scout Troop 450 played taps on his trumpet to close out the ceremonies.

Following are the complete remarks of Major General Helix:

Thank you all very much. Mr. Mayor and Council members…honored guests…and fellow citizens: what an honor it is to speak to you on this occasion, and what a privilege it is to have worn one of the uniforms of my country, as many of you here have as well.

Placing of the Wreath by Mayor Wade Harper and VFW Post Commander Henri Villeaux

Placing of the Wreath by Mayor Wade Harper and VFW Post Commander Henri Villeaux

For more than a century and a half, Americans have gathered on this day to remember those who were lost and that which was gained. Memorial Day is a day when celebration and sadness walk hand in hand. I have heard that celebration is the wrong word to use, but commemoration is more appropriate. It is the day our nation has set aside to remember, reflect and honor our service members who gave the ultimate sacrifice in defense of our country whether in battle, in support of combat operations, or even those who were doing the job of ensuring the peace. In short, today is a day about remembering those who died for our freedom –  pure and simple.

As Kasey Pipes, then a Navy LT, later a speech writer for the White House, remarked on the occasion of Memorial Day some years ago, “The actions of those patriots are far more eloquent than any words I can offer.”

Places like Bunker Hill and Guadalcanal, Little Round Top and the Ia Drang Valley, the courageous heroes who fought and died wrote new chapters in the story of freedom.

When he dedicated the battlefield at Gettysburg in 1863, President Lincoln spoke of the inadequacy of words on occasions such as these: “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

And so it is with us today. The eloquence of words cannot match the power of the sacrifices made by so many. We honor them. We praise them. We remember them.

And we do something else also: we acknowledge that their struggle—the ancient struggle to be free—goes on today. Like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, that when put together as a whole produce a picture, so too all the battles in our history are connected to the larger struggle for freedom for all men and women.

It has been the citizen volunteer soldier who has fought the wars of this country. The first piece of the puzzle was set in place when the first musket was fired at Concord, Mass. They all showed up to fight: farmers, students, craftsmen, and clerks –  they answered the call.

Then in 1812 a British armada came down from Canada to sack and burn Washington D.C. and attack Baltimore, guarded by Ft. McHenry. The fort held through the bombardment inspiring Francis Scott Key’s “Star Spangled Banner” and the British abandoned their Western outposts and what was then the Northwest was ceded to the United States.

After that the Mexican war, which became a metaphor for the triumph of will, determination and a belief in Manifest Destiny that demonstrated the continuing of the indomitable American spirit that demands freedom even today.

Slavery was the issue of the 1860’s and it divided our nation. The Civil War began with the firing on Ft. Sumter, South Carolina. The Battle Hymn of the Republic clashed with Dixie in a prolonged and tragically bloody war. Johnny (eventually) came marching home and the Union was preserved.

The next piece of the puzzle was set in place during World War I, when we fought “over there”. The doughboys experienced the hell of mustard gas and trench warfare. Because of our fighting men America became a player onto the world stage. We showed that a democracy, in the right circumstances can be imbued with the soul of battle and turn the horror of killing to a higher purpose of demanding that nations be allowed to live in freedom.

December 7th 1941 the date that has lived in infamy, “Remember Pearl Harbor” was the rallying cry that mobilized an outraged nation. American blood was spilled in both the European and Pacific Theaters of war. Finally, in 1945, on May 8th in Europe and August 14th in Japan, Germany and Japan surrendered unconditionally and an entire nation, on bended knees, gratefully thanked God for what would be called the Greatest Generation.

They were the citizen soldiers with an ethical zeal who became the most ruthless of men and endured murderous seasons. When the war ended they melted anonymously back into the culture of the peacetime democracy that produced them. They were the volunteers who evinced the soul and spirit of the warrior.

On a little known Korean Peninsula, situated between the Yellow Sea and Sea of Japan, Thousands of Americans would die as the surrogates of our being unprepared. Dog faced soldiers and Marines thrown into combat on the Pusan Perimeter, and were welcomed to the war with 21 bullets and three hand grenades. With the heroic fighting breakout by the U.S. Marines at the Chosin Reservoir, the phrase Retreat Hell would become two words separated by a comma. America demonstrated that we would shed blood fighting to repel invaders who espoused a morality fundamentally repugnant to our own. Officially there were 36,261 KIA, an average of 980 Combat deaths per month during that “conflict”.

The courageous men and women who fought in Vietnam, fought a war, in a time and place no one really understood. These men and women knew only one thing – they were called and they went. They were needed and they were there. That, in the truest sense, is why we are here today. That is the Spirit of America. The more we understand it, the more we honor those who kept the spirit alive. 58,000 of America’s finest paid the ultimate price.

Another piece of the puzzle was put in place with Desert Shield/Desert Storm. As a nation, we learned to better express our appreciation for those men and women who stand in harm’s way.  A new generation of precision guided munitions convinced Saddam Hussein his attempt to annex Kuwait would not be tolerated.

In Bosnia and Kosovo we found timid leaders can be more concerned about their political image than the security of those they send into harm’s way.  We must insist that we never let our troops get involved with a foreign country where America’s power is not totally involved. Some of you will know from where this comes, but there is a saying that half measures availed us nothing.

The suicide bombings of the twin towers of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on 9/11/2001 made it clear that America was at war with terrorists. Our past involvement in Iraq contributed to the courage displayed by the Iraqi people in passing that nation’s first test of democracy, and we pray our current involvement in Afghanistan will prove to have a similar effect.

What we now know is this: the that first time an American combat soldier knelt down to laugh and visit with a group of Iraqi children, he did more to help our world than all the billions spent by the United Nations. We are honored to have some of these veterans here with us today, along with their Blue Star Moms and Dads. And since I mention the Mom’s and Dad’s I would be remiss to not recognize our Gold Star Families – Moms, Dads, brothers, sisters and grandparents. Whether they personally ever put on a uniform or not, their service must be seen as the most selfless, sacrificial and patriotic service of all.  We know none of them ever aspired to or desired that, but in the end that is the case. We are sure none of them ever wanted that, but in the end they are the patriots with the most skin in the game short only of those who paid the ultimate price, their loved ones. I will tell you, Gold star families while we can never know the full extent of your loss, we share that loss, we grieve that loss and we honor the sacrifice with gratitude that we live in a free United States today. Jesus Himself said there can be no greater sacrifice one can make than to die for another. And so through the years and wars, Americans have never ceased to honor those who gave all.

We need a special salute to all those who served during the Cold War that raged from 1945 – 1991. There were plenty of clashes. The Iron Curtain in Europe, the Bamboo Curtain in Asia, the missile crisis, thankless battlefields in Grenada and El Salvador, descending into the Heart of Darkness in the Congo and the hot battlefield of Angola. Thousands of Americans in uniform died outside war zones from hostile and non-hostile causes. We remember and honor our fallen brothers and sisters. We learned sad lessons from the fiascos in Somalia, Rwanda and Haiti. Don’t spout the rhetoric if you’re not willing to back it up.

The troops around the world today are the direct descendants of the troops that crossed the Potomac  and landed on D-Day . The battle fronts may be different. The weapons may have changed. But the fight is the same. We know that to protect our freedom at home we must promote freedom throughout the world.

In that spirit, let me take a moment and briefly talk about the world we live in. First, we are fighting a global war that will last for many years and require many assets. We fight an enemy that is evil but effective, deadly, and despicable. We cannot underestimate this enemy or the new world in which we live.

We now live in the most interconnected world in history. Consider its impact. Globalization means a businessman in New York can have his U.S. income taxes prepared in India. Globalization means a farmer in Japan can sell his produce in Maryland. And globalization means that from Florida to the Philippines…from Tacoma, Washington to Tokyo, Japan…goods, services and people are flowing more freely and more directly than ever before.

Trying to hold back this trend is like standing on the beach and trying to hold back the waves. It can’t be done. We can’t turn it back. Nor should we want to. The future is coming whether we plan for it or not. And for the most part, these are all very positive developments for the region and the world.

But while globalization brings many opportunities, it also presents some obstacles. We must be aware and we must be alert. We saw the dark side of globalization on September 11, 2001. Travelers from another country gained easy access to America, purchased plane tickets, and carried out the worst terrorist attack in American history.

No doubt about it—we now live in the post-9/11 world. No longer can we count on the good intentions of evil people. No more can we simply wait to be attacked. And that is exactly what the brave men and women of our armed forces are doing all over the globe right now: taking the battle to the terrorists.

Yes, we live in a different century filled with new challenges. But we are engaging it with a different Military focused on new capacities. And we have to be ready. The only times in our history where we have had to go fight, not just supply advisors and trainers, is not when we have had a lack of resolve or were technologically inferior, but when we have had a numerically weak Armed Forces. What military we have on watch today is ready for the future. This is where we need our young folks to step up and volunteer to be part of the deterrent and solution for this country. For you young folks, the military may not be for everyone, but if you feel up to the challenge – then take the challenge, your country needs you.

Almost 30 years ago, in his farewell address to the nation, President Ronald Reagan told the story of a sailor on the U.S.S. Midway. The sailor was on the deck one day as a small boat filled with Indonesian refugees approached. One of the refugees shouted out in a loud voice: “Hello, American sailor! Hello, freedom man!”

Today, the same refrain is heard throughout the world. From the survivors of the Natural Disasters to the villages of Afghanistan, wherever and whenever the people of the world see the military men and women of our country, they see the faces of freedom…they see the defenders of liberty…they see the ambassadors of hope.

Every day, Our United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard have the chance to make the world safer. And they can.

Every day, Our United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard have the ability to spread freedom. And they will.

Every day, Our United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard has the power to fight and destroy terrorists. And they must.

I believe we will win this battle. I believe we will preserve, protect, and promote freedom.

And as we continue to patrol the city streets and seas in support of missions throughout the world, I believe our military will do so in a way that respects its citizens here at home and honors our ancestors before us.

The greatest tribute we can offer to those who have died is to wave the banner of freedom proudly.

This Memorial Day and every day…

May we never forget those who died…

May we never fail to live up to their standard…

And may we never falter in our fight for freedom at home and abroad.

On this Memorial Day weekend, our thoughts and prayers are with all of those who are grieving. May we, as Abraham Lincoln said, “highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Finally, on this Memorial Day 2016 may God bless you all, may God bless our Service Members and Veterans, may God bless the families of our fallen and may God Bless America.

 

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Missing baby’s body recovered, car located Sunday, in same slough south of Walnut Grove as father’s

Sunday, May 29th, 2016
Kaylee Jackson, age 1 and her father Kyler Jackson.

Kaylee Jackson, age 1 and her father Kyler Jackson.

By Sergeant Tony Turnbull, Sacramento County Sheriff’s Spokesman

In the morning hours of May 29, 2016, the Sheriff’s Department Marine Enforcement Detail resumed their search for the second victim and missing vehicle in the area of Georgiana Slough in South Sacramento County.  At approximately 12:30 p.m., a boater observed a small body in the slough just north of Tyler Island Bridge.  Marine Enforcement deputies responded and recovered the deceased victim from the water.  The Sacramento Coroner’s office responded, and identified the victim as Kaylee Jackson.

2002 Ford Taurus JacksonThe prior evening (May 28, 2016) at approximately 5:45 p.m., the Sheriff’s Communication Center received a call regarding a body located in the water in the Georgiana Slough in South Sacramento County.

Sheriff’s Deputies and the Walnut Grove Fire Department responded to the scene.  The victim was recovered from the water.  The Sacramento County Coroner responded and positively identified the victim as 23-year-old Kyler Jackson, who was reported as a missing person with his daughter, Kaylee, out of Antioch, California on May 23rd by family members.

At 6:55 pm, Sunday, May 29, 2016 Sheriff’s Marine Detail and DART (Drowning Accident Rescue Team) team members confirmed they located the victim’s vehicle in 18 feet of water.  It was located near the confluence of the Sacramento River and Georgiana Slough.  They will be in the process of recovering the vehicle from the water.

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Body of Sacramento man missing with his daughter from Antioch since Sunday night, found in slough near Walnut Grove

Sunday, May 29th, 2016
Father Kyler and daughter Kaylee Jackson

Kyler Jackson and daughter Kaylee, went missing after leaving Antioch, Sunday night, May 22, 2016.

By Allen Payton

The Sacramento Sheriff’s Department has confirmed that the body of missing Sacramento man Kyler Jackson was found in a slough near Walnut Grove.

As was reported by the Herald on Thursday, May 26, Jackson and his one-year-old daughter Kaylee were last seen in Antioch last Sunday, May 22 at 11:00 p.m. The baby’s mother, Jayonna Mason and Kyler’s mother both contacted police on Monday after attempts to reach Jackson by cell phone were unsuccessful. They believed the behavior was out of character for him.

A security camera in Walnut Grove on the river road picked up what was believed to be a video of Jackson’s car, a 2002, 4-door, silver Ford Taurus (CA license # 4WVW944), Sunday night.

Jackson has a past address listed in the 3500 block of San Jose Way in Sacramento.  The Sacramento Police Department had made several attempts to locate Mr. Jackson at his residence with no avail.

Sacramento County Sheriff’s Spokesman Sergeant Tony Turnbull, provided the following information in a press release, this morning:

At approximately 5:45 p.m. on May 28, 2016, the Sheriff’s Communication Center received a call regarding a body located in the water in the Georgiana Slough in South Sacramento County.

Sheriff’s Deputies and the Walnut Grove Fire Department responded to the scene.  The victim was recovered from the water.  The Sacramento County Coroner responded and positively identified the victim as 23-year-old Kyler Jackson.

Members of the Sheriff’s Department Marine Enforcement Detail were called out to continue searching the waterways in the area in search of the missing vehicle and his daughter, Kaylee Jackson who was still missing.  The Marine Enforcement Detail located an anomaly in the area of Andrus Island Road and the Walnut Grove Bridge using sonar equipment.  The Drowning Accident Rescue Team (DART) was called out in attempts to identify the anomaly.  The search was suspended at approximately 10:30 p.m., because of dangerous conditions.

The Sheriff’s Marine Enforcement Detail resumed their search this morning. DART will be utilized again, if deputies are able to identify a potential target under water with their sonar equipment.

We will continue to provide updates to this story as additional reports are received and details are confirmed.

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Hardcastle continues to lead in money battle in race for District 3 Supervisor, Burgis close behind in spending

Saturday, May 28th, 2016

By Allen Payton

Candidates and campaigns were required to file financial reports on Thursday, May 26 for the period of April 24 through May 21, 2016. Oakley Councilman Doug Hardcastle continues to lead in the amount of funds raised and spent in the campaign. East Bay Regional Parks District Board Member Diane Burgis is second behind Hardcastle in expenditures, but has the most in monetary contributions, and in unaid bills. But, Brentwood Councilman Steve Barr, has raised more than Burgis in total contributions. Antioch Councilwoman Monica Wilson is in a close fourth in fundraising, in both monetary and total contributions.

Following is the financial information submitted by the candidates in the District 3 Supervisor race for the latest period with their place in each category in parenthesis:

Doug Hardcastle

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $8,297

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $1,675

Total Contributions Received for the period: $9,972 (3rd)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $25,308.16 (4th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $47,483.16 (1st)

Expenditures Made during period: $11,176.07

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $45,818.87 (1st)

Ending Cash Balance: $1,664.29

Outstanding Debts: $15,500 (2nd) – all loans from himself

After his report was submitted, Hardcastle discovered a file of monetary contributions totaling approximately $700 and an in-kind contribution of $750 from a fundraiser in May, that was not included in the latest report. He will be submitting an amended report, this next week.

 

Steve Barr

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $9,100.00 – Most from within the district.

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $1,200

Total Contributions Received for the period: $10,300 (2nd)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $27,785 (2nd)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $38,635 (2nd)

Expenditures Made during period: $28,594, paid down previous unpaid bills of $17,035

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $31,768 (3rd)

Ending Cash Balance: $1,417

Outstanding Debts: $6,550 (3rd) – $5,000 in loans from himself

 

Diane Burgis

Monetary Contributions Received during the period: $10,798

Non-Monetary Contributions Received: $ -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $10,798 (1st)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,655 (1st)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,755 (3rd)

Expenditures Made during period: $15,336.52

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $8,098.85

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $41,905.38 (2nd)

Ending Cash Balance: $11,220.23

Outstanding Debts: $23,470.06 (1st) – $100 in loans from herself

Almost all of her contributions were received during the period from and most of her money was spent outside of the district.

 

Monica Wilson

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $6,665.16

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $1,927.88

Total Contributions Received for the period: $8,593.04 (4th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $27,075.92 (3rd)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $29,121.86 (4th)

Expenditures Made during period: $12,704.75 paid down previous unpaid bills of $11,462.87

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $29,215.95 (4th)

Ending Cash Balance of $8,209.89

Outstanding Debts: $3,124.98 (4th)

All of her contributions were received during the period from and most of her money was spent outside of the district, with the majority of it spent out of state for yard signs and direct mail.

 

Odessa Lefrancois

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $1,140.00

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $   -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $1,140.00 (6th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $13,025.00 (5th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $13,025.00 (5th)

Expenditures Made during period: $2,312.22

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $11,590.02 (5th)

Ending Cash Balance of $1,434.98

Outstanding Debts: $ -0-

She will have to file an amended report, as hers does not show the Year to Date Totals on the Summary page.

 

Wade Harper

Monetary Contributions Received during period: $1,675.00

Non-Monetary Contributions received: $   -0-

Total Contributions Received for the period: $1,675.00 (5th)

Monetary Contributions Received during the campaign: $9,725.00 (6th)

Total Contributions Received during the campaign: $9,725.00 (6th)

Expenditures Made during period: $3,287.00

Accrued Expenses (unpaid bills) for the period: $ -0-

Total Expenditures Made during the campaign: $8,950.54 (6th)

Ending Cash Balance of $774.46

Outstanding Debts: $ -0-

Please see the financial reports, posted below.

Publisher’s Note: For full disclosure and as explained in the March issue of the Antioch Herald, I, the writer of this article, am the paid consultant for Doug Hardcastle’s campaign for County Supervisor.

Barr 460 0424-52116

Burgis 460 0424-052116

Hardcastle 460 0424-052116

Harper 460 0424-052116

Lefrancois 460 0424-052116

Wilson 460 0424-052116

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Former long-time Oakley School Board member and teacher endorses Doug Hardcastle for Supervisor

Saturday, May 28th, 2016

Editor:

Honesty – Community Dedication – Fiscal Responsibility

I have known Doug Hardcastle for over 25 years. I know him to be hard working, honest and dedicated to the improvement of the whole community. His community work has always been based on what is best for the citizens.

Bob Kratina

Former Oakley School Board Member, 21 years

Retired Teacher, 38 years

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San Pablo man dies from gunshot wounds in Antioch, early Saturday morning, police investigating

Saturday, May 28th, 2016

By Lieutenant Anthony Morefield, Antioch Police Investigations Bureau

On Saturday morning May, 28, 2016 at approximately 4:00 AM, Antioch Police Officers responded to a report of a shooting in front of a home in the 2100 block of Manzanita Way. The officers arrived to find an adult male victim down, suffering from apparent gunshot wounds and other injuries.

Medical personnel were there a short time later and began life saving measures, but the victim, a 41-year-old San Pablo resident, ultimately died from his injuries at the scene.

This case is currently being investigated by the Antioch Police Department Investigations Bureau. We are in the preliminary stages of this case,and no further information will be released at this time.

Anyone with information regarding this case is encouraged to call Detective James Colley with the Antioch Police Department at (925) 779-6922. You may also text a tip to 274637 (CRIMES) using key word ANTIOCH.

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